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Guyana Turns 48 Years Old

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Special to the NNPA from the New York Carib News

CMC – Guyana is celebrating its 48th anniversary as an independent country with acknowledging that the journey has been “long and arduous” and characterised by “valiant struggles and acts of mass heroism as well as great individual feats”.

In his address to the nation, President Donald Ramotar said that country is marking the milestone of its political history in a world that has grown more complex, more interconnected, but, unfortunately, one which still remains very unequal between the developing South and the developed North.

“International relations today are still dominated and determined by a handful of rich countries. Many of the institutions established, particularly the international financial institutions mostly geared to serve the interest of the most rich and powerful countries.”

He said developing countries have to manage the affairs of their states in a great disadvantageous situation and this is reflected in the growing inequality in relation to access to resources and the huge income gap between the rich and poor countries of the world.

Ramotar said that the richest 85 persons in the world are worth more than the poorest 3.5 billion persons and that almost a half of the world’s wealth is owned by just one percent of the population.

“The struggle, therefore, for socio-economic justice and a more equitable world, continues. One of the major issues is the need to democratise international relations. It is patently evident that the vast majority of countries in the world and by extension the peoples of those countries do not have enough influence on international politics and economics.”

Ramotar said that the situation demands that Guyana continues to build greater solidarity among the developing world while it works in alliance with those developed countries interested in genuine partnership.

He said the country must also continue to take the lead in promoting regional unity and pledge to work tirelessly within the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) to bring stronger bonds and integration of the peoples of the region.

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