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Penn State Scandal Similar to Boston Red Sox Manager Molestation of Black Boys

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Special to the NNPA from the Afro-American Newspaper –

Long before news broke of the Penn State sex scandal, it has now been revealed that between 1971 and 1991, Donald Fitzpatrick, a former Boston Red Sox manager, systematically abused and molested dozens of African American boys in their hometown of Winter Haven, Florida, where the baseball team held their Spring training.

"He grabbed me and told me to take my clothes off," Leeronnie Ogletree, who said Fitzpatrick lured him into years of molestation when he was just 10, told thepostgame.com. "I'll never forget him putting his mouth on my penis. I don't mind telling it now because I'm over it. But that stands out. And I'll never forget it."

It took decades for the truth to come out about Fitzpatrick, who is White, and his criminal desire for young Black boys, according to The Huffington Post. In 2003, the Boston Red Sox settled a $3 million federal lawsuit brought against them by Ogletree and seven other men from Winter Haven who said Fitzpatrick repeatedly molested them as boys.

Benjamin Crump, the lawyer who handled Ogletree’s case against Fitzpatrick and the Boston Red Sox, said the similarities between the Penn State and Red Sox scandals are startlingly similar, the Post reported. There were cover-ups, denials and the enabling of pedophiles to use the power of their institutions to prey on the weak, in the Red Sox case, "poor black boys," he said. The kinds of youth often considered society's "throwaways."

"You have these sports institutions; you have all these people of authority; you have all this public support for these institutions and hear talk about what great institutions they are, but then when you ask them to do the right thing and have compassion for these young people, the institutions deny, deny, deny," Crump, of Parks & Crump, told The Huffington Post. "They sweep it under the rug and they look the other way."

According to reports, former Red Sox players such as Jim Rice and Sammy Stewart got wind of Fitzpatrick's deeds and would warn kids in the clubhouse to avoid him, the Post reported. In 1971, one of Fitzpatrick's victims came forward to the team, and in a manner similar to Penn State's handling of the Jerry Sandusky allegations, the team did not alert authorities or fire Fitzpatrick.

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