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U.S.-Africa Trade Bill Comes Up Short for Africa, Kenyans Say

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Special to the NNPA from the Global Information Network –

A highly-touted U.S.-Africa trade bill comes up for renewal in 2015 and some Kenyans are demanding to see better results for Africa.

The Kenyan officials were speaking at the close of the African Growth and Opportunity Act Forum in Lusaka, Zambia, last week. AGOA, as the bill is known, was designed to provide preferential access to Africa’s products in U.S. markets.

In the spirit of “trade not aid,” Kenyan Trade Minister Chirau Ali Mwakwere criticized foreign countries for showering African countries with aid. "If you look at the amount of money [given as Aid] that has been pumped into Kenya and Africa, it has not been effective,” he said. “If you give money to people there is no sustainability. But if you have a business, it is a bit more dignified. It is good for employees, but also the business and the economy."

He faulted strict U.S. rules that limit the export sector in Kenya. "(Our farm) products are accepted in Europe but not in the U.S. If they are accepted in Europe, where they are consumed by Americans, why not in the U.S.?" Mwakwere asked.

U.S. Trade Secretary Ron Kirk opened the AGOA meeting in Zambia, saying: "The United States is committed to promoting Africa’s economic growth through trade, and AGOA is a critical pillar in growing the U.S. economic relationship with sub-Saharan nations."

While agriculture remains the pillar of Africa’s economy, trade data shows that agri-related exports from sub-Saharan Africa to the U.S. under AGOA account for only one percent. The most common export is still a barrel of oil.

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