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Near Total Media Blackout for Egyptian 'March of a Million'

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Special to the NNPA from the Global Information Network –

Images of a historic popular uprising in Egypt against the 30 year rule of autocrat Hosni Mubarak have been all but blacked out by hostile media in the U.S.

A Comcast deal to carry the Middle East news wire Al Jazeera English was scrapped in 2006 and no other U.S. cable company-approved network offers it. The world class reporting by Aljazeera can, however, be seen in Canada and in a small number of American cities in Ohio, Vermont, and Washington D.C.

A similar blackout was taking place this week in Egypt as Pres. Mubarak pressed the telcom Vodaphone to turn off the internet, Facebook, Twitter, and other social media. "We have been working round the clock to make sure we are broadcasting on alternative frequencies. Clearly there are powers that do not want our important images pushing for democracy and reform to be seen by the public," a Jazeera spokesman was quoted to say by the Reuters news agency.

According to Reuters, at least one million Egyptians took to the streets last week in scenes never before seen in the Arab nation's modern history, roaring in unison for President Hosni Mubarak and his new government to quit.

Mona Eltahawy, Egyptian-born columnist, in a radio interview, said: “I’ve never seen anything like it… Mubarak shuts down the internet, shuts down the train system, and shuts down almost the entire country and still they come,“ referring to the widening street protests.

Meanwhile, the managing editor of The Root, a popular Black website, wondered aloud at the silence of African Americans in a piece titled “Where Are the Black Voices on Egypt and Tunisia?”

“African Americans have traditionally been the conscience of the country on foreign policy issues,” wrote Root’s managing editor Joel Dreyfuss. “That's what makes the silence today so startling.”

He rebuked the Congressional Black Caucus for their hesitancy, and suggested that the role played by Gen. Colin Powell and Condoleeze Rice shifted the African American role from outsider to insider. “The result has been the diminution of an American voice that gave people abroad hope that at least some of us were sympathetic to their struggles,” he said.

But this silence may not matter much now, he continued. In Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere, they’re on the move – with or without help from America’s political establishment.

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