A+ R A-

News Wire

20 Years after Magic – HIV/AIDS is Still an Issue

E-mail Print PDF

By Wendell Huston, Special to the NNPA from the Chicago Crusader –

Hall of Fame basketball star Earvin “Magic” Johnson brought his HIV/AIDS awareness campaign to Chicago this week to celebrate the 20 years he has lived with the deadly disease. And although Johnson did not come to Chicago his presence was felt loud and clear at a South Side Walgreens where free HIV testing took place.

Charles Jenkins, 56, said he is a regular customer at Walgreens, 11 E. 75th St., so it only made sense to get tested while there. “I’m an old man now but back in my younger years I was a ‘player.’ I slept with my fair share of women and did not always use condoms,” he recalled. “Back then AIDS was not considered a big deal because mainly gay men had the disease. Every year I get tested just to be on the safe side. And like every year since I started getting tested five years ago, this was a good year because I am HIV negative.”

Free education about HIV/AIDS was what attracted Oliva Barber, 19. “I want to know as much as I can about HIV because it has hit my generation hard,” she said. “I have not made a habit of sleeping around but I have had unprotected sex before. And it is for that reason I came here to get tested and educated more about the disease.” On Monday the National Basketball Association’s all-time assist leader simultaneously kicked off a 16-city, HIV/AIDS awareness campaign called Point Forward Day, which is sponsored by the entrepreneur’s Magic Johnson Foundation.

From 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Walgreens provided free testing by taking a mouth sample from participants who were able to get their results back in 20-minutes, said Carlos Meyers, executive director of Beyond Care Inc., a Chicago, non-profit social service organization, which administered the free HIV tests. The goal, said Meyers, was to test up to 500 people. “We are not there yet but getting there,” added Meyers. “I would say about 60 percent of the 300 people we have tested so far were middle-class, Black women. I hope before we finish we get more Black men and youth tested because those two groups usually do not get tested enough to know if they have been infected.”

At Crusader press time, no one had tested HIV positive. And counselors were on hand to assist anyone whose results were positive.

The MJF arranged for free testing from the West Coast to the East Coast in predominately minority communities where HIV education and testing is needed the most, said Amelia William-son, interim president of the Magic Johnson Foundation.

“It is time for the Magic Johnson Foundation to communicate the impact we have had in urban communities across the US. Point Forward Day is about getting involved and giving back like Magic has done,” Williamson said. “It is time for all of us to stop spectating and start doing! Through our continued work in educational empowerment, it is our hope to cyclically cultivate, inspire and help to achieve self sufficiency in underserved communities.”

Besides Chicago, other cities that participated in the Point Forward Day were Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, and New Orleans. In 1991, Johnson, a point guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, shocked the world when he announced he had tested HIV positive. “Because of the HIV virus that I have attained, I will have to retire from the Lakers today. I just want to make it clear, first of all, that I do not have the AIDS disease,” he said during an emotional news conference. In Chicago, Blacks are disproportionately affected by HIV, according to the city’s Health Department. Additionally, city health officials said Blacks represent only 36 percent of the city’s population yet account for 55 percent of recently diagnosed HIV infections. Of the 22,650 people living with HIV/AIDS in Chicago, 54 percent are Black, 27 percent are White, 16 percent are Hispanic, and 3 percent are of another race.

Nationally, the problem is much worse. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that at the end of 2010, more than 1.1 million adults and adolescents were living with HIV infection in American and HIV continues to be a leading cause of death. In 2005, HIV was the fifth leading cause of death among people aged 35 to 44. The impact is greater on Blacks and Hispanics.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HIV was the third leading cause of death for Blacks aged 35 to 44, the fourth leading cause for Hispanics 35 to 44 and the fifth leading cause of death for Whites 25 to 44.

Gary Celebrates Indiana's First Black Mayor

E-mail Print PDF

Special to the NNPA from the Florida Sentinel Bulletin –

GARY – Karen Freeman-Wilson was elected the first Black female mayor in Indiana on Tuesday night.

“It’s great to make history,” the Gary attorney said just before the celebration began at the Genesis Convention Center in Gary for hundreds of her supporters.

Freeman-Wilson, a Gary native, received a law degree in 1985 from Harvard University. Ebony magazine named her one of the country’s 50 leaders of the future for the Black community a year after then-Gov. Evan Bayh named her director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission, the first of many of her public responsibilities involving social and racial equality.

She became Gary city judge in 1994 and Indiana attorney general in 2000. She ran unsuccessfully for Gary mayor in 2003 and 2007.

She now must confront a city government hobbled by high tax rates, declining tax revenues and the need to provide services to a population in which a significant number of people are below the poverty line and unemployed.

U.S. to Head Zimbabwe 'Blood Diamonds' Monitoring Group

E-mail Print PDF

By Fungai Maboreke, Special to the NNPA from the Global Information Network –

Nov. 8 (GIN) – The United States has captured the chair of the Kimberley process certification scheme, allowing Washington to have a major role in whether Zimbabwe may sell its diamonds on the world market starting in 2012.

The Kimberly Process is an international government certification scheme set up in 2003 to prevent the trade in so-called “blood diamonds” that fund conflicts.

Opposition to Zimbabwe diamond sales came regularly from human rights groups who claimed there were abuses against illegal miners, that smuggling was rife and that certain mines remained in the hands of Zimbabwe's military forces.

But monitoring teams sent by Kimberley concluded the country had met minimum regulatory standards and sales were finally permitted this year.

Zimbabwe is a major exporter with potential to constitute about 20 percent of diamonds traded on international markets. At current production capacities, Zimbabwe could rake in excess of US$2 billion from diamond revenues each year.

Threats of Violence Spark War Flashbacks as Liberian Election Goes Forward

E-mail Print PDF

Special to the NNPA from the Global Information Network –

Nov. 8 (GIN) – Threats of a mass boycott of Liberian national elections by opposition party leader Winston Tubman sparked fears of a return to civil war chaos, prompting voters to stay home in droves, it was reported.

Poll observers in Monrovia reported many fewer voters than in the first round vote last month. Sporadic outbreaks of violence left at least five people dead despite the presence of U.N. peacekeepers and a Nobel Peace Prize president, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who has been favored to win this second run-off voting round.

Johnson-Sirleaf’s rival for the top spot is ex-justice minister Winston Tubman from the Congress for Democratic Change, with ex-soccer star George Weah as his running mate. Votes are being tallied and the winner could be announced as early as this week.

Tubman had demanded a delay of two to four weeks after finding three ballot boxes he said were tampered. His call for a boycott was rejected and criticized by international observers, ECOWAS and other regional bodies.

Meanwhile, a study by the Liberia Media Center found bias in the majority of the print and electronic media. The study titled “Because Accountability Matters,” covered the period of Sept-Oct 2011, and involved seven radio stations and 11 newspapers.

“The media performed dismally in reporting on political parties, candidates and issues regarding the electoral processes,” the report read. “Programming accounted for the unprofessionalism and biases of the media.”

Journalists must remain non-partisan even if they are in the employ of media owners with partisan agenda," said the Center’s director, Lawrence Randall. “Above all else, media owners should seek to promote diversity and undue monopolization of their outlet by any single political party.”

Gaddafi Planned Retirement in South Africa

E-mail Print PDF

By Fungai Maboreke, Special to the NNPA from the Global Information Network –

Nov. 1 (GIN) - The late Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi believed he was headed for Karoo, a desert-like area in South Africa, where he would live in a tent under the protection of his allies, when he was fatally ambushed by joint NATO-Libyan forces.

Reports of South African fighters hired to guide the fallen Libyan leader have appeared in two South African papers in the Afrikaans language. The South African soldiers of fortune are now stranded abroad but officials of the government, a former Gaddafi ally, are offering no support.

“Any South African who is involved in military matters in Libya would do so illegally and at own risk. They are their own responsibility," Siphiwe Dlamini, a defense department spokesman, told the newspaper Beeld. "According to the Prohibition of Mercenary Activity Act of 2006, South Africans are forbidden from entering any conflict area in any part of the world on either side," Dlamini said.

Meanwhile, Gaddafi’s second son, Saif al-Islam, continues to make his escape through friendly countries such as Niger, although the International Criminal Court which seeks his prosecution says he is making contact for surrender through an intermediary.

Page 194 of 342

Quantcast