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FASHION SHOW

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Kansas Ave SDA Church will host a Fashion Show on Saturday, October 20, 2012 beginning at 6:30 pm-9:30 pm. Kansas Ave SDA Church is located at 4491 Kansas Ave, Riverside, CA 92507. Adult tickets are $20 and children (12 and under) $10. There will be a silent auction, vendors, and photo booth. For more information contact (951) 347-2010.

HEALTH FAIR

Spirit of Hope Church is hosting a Health Fair November 10, 2012 at 9:00 am-2:00 pm., 1820 E Highland Ave, San Bernardino, CA 92404. There will be free food, fun, and prizes for everyone. For more information, contact 909-882-2961.

“IGNITE 2012: BACK TO CHRIST” REVIVAL OCTOBER 12 & 13

Dunamis Power Christian Fellowship (DPCF) Pastors Warren and Vitina White cordially invite the Inland Empire community to share in a spiritual renewal experience at the “Ignite 2012: Back to Christ” revival to be held at 7 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, October 12 and 13 at the church sanctuary located at 2700 Little Mountain Road, Building G in San Bernardino, Ca. (92405).  On Friday, October 12, Bishop Candace Shields of Twice Called Christian Center located in San Bernardino, Ca. will be the featured speaker at 7 p.m.. Saturday, October 13 is “Youth and Adult Night” and Prophet Timothy Allen will be the feature speaker at 7 p.m. There will also be a special performance from the A.C.T.S Mime Ministries. For more information contact (909) 440-4817.

UC RIVERSIDE TO ADDRESS WATER POLICY IN THE WEST

Three experts on water issues will give talks at a public symposium at the University of California, Riverside on Oct. 17.  The two-hour symposium, which starts at 4 p.m. in the Alumni & Visitors Center, is titled “Water Policy in the West.” Reservations for the free symposium are required and can be made by emailing HYPERLINK "mailto:carol.obrien@ucr.edu" carol.obrien@ucr.edu.  Parking will be free for attendees in Lot 24. The three speakers — Glenn Schaible at USDA, Ari Michelsen at Texas A&M University and Ellen Hanak at the Public Policy Institute of California — will address challenges that agriculture and other sectors are confronting in the face of increasing water scarcity and expected climate change.  They will address, too, the strategies needed to meet projected water demands. For more information, please visit: HYPERLINK "http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/9346" \t "_blank" http://ucrtoday.ucr.edu/9346

Dymally

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Former California Lieutenant Governor and first Black to serve in this position, Mervyn M. Dymally affectionately referred to as the “Godfather of African-American politics”, passed away Sunday in Los Angeles, Calif.  He was 86.

Dymally’s wife, Alice Gueno Dymally who recently lost her mother Alice Walker Gueno said in a statement, “My beloved husband of 44-years Mervyn Dymally passed away very peacefully this morning at 6:30 a.m. He lived a very extraordinary life and had no regrets.” Dymally in his career accomplished many firsts. He was the nation’s first Black Lieutenant Governor, first Black California State Senator and was a pioneer member of the Congressional Black Caucus. Upon hearing of the passing of Dymally, his former colleagues, government officials, and contemporaries paid tribute to Dymally in issued statements. Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. stated: "Mervyn Dymally was an extraordinary man who spent his life breaking new ground and advancing the cause of civil rights and equality. He was both a thinker and a doer, bearing deep knowledge but never hesitating to take action where action was warranted. California has lost an important leader."

California Attorney General Kamala D. Harris issued the following statement on the passing of Mervyn Dymally: "I am tremendously saddened to hear of the passing of my friend, former Congressman and Lieutenant Governor Mervyn Dymally. Representative Dymally was a true role model for generations of Californians, not least because of his barrier-breaking legacy as one of the first persons of color to serve at the state and federal levels of our great nation. His lifelong commitment to justice during his time in Congress, the state legislature and the Lieutenant Governorship of California will continue to inspire us as we work to further the vision of equality that he championed for more than five decades. My prayers are with his wife, Alice, daughter Lynn and son Mark during this difficult time."

Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter stated, “How can you comment on someone who is bigger than life? I was introduced to him during our long relationship with the late Congressman George Brown and continued my relationship through my tenure in the Assembly. He was an amazing man. You know a person by the way he treats his wife and he treated his wife with love, respect and honor. We will truly miss his leadership in our state.”

Candidate for the 47th Assembly District, Cheryl Brown stated: “He is the consummate statesman, always the political teacher who never stopped giving back to the state and the country. My family has been supporters of Mr. Dymally his entire political career. My mother knew him well and when I announced my candidacy for the Assembly, Mr. Dymally gave me council and sent more than one contribution. I will miss him as the campaign moves forward. He was always there to give advice.” Congresswoman Janice Hahn released the following statement: “Mervyn Dymally was an icon, a legend, and one of the most loved and revered leaders in all of California. He was a fierce advocate for his constituents as a State Legislator, member of Congress, and as California’s 41st Lieutenant Governor. He was a man of strong principles and values. We will always be grateful for his leadership in the building of MLK Hospital in Watts. He’s always been a mentor and a friend. Mervyn will surely be missed.”

Assemblymember Isadore Hall in a statement said, "For decades, Mervyn Dymally served California with an unwavering passion and commitment.  Merv’s legacy helped open the doors of opportunity for his and future generations and hisspirit will live on in the lives of the many leaders he inspired.  Our state and country are a better place because of his lifetime of work.  I am honored to have called him my friend and mentor.  My thoughts and prayers are with his family.” In honoring the memory of former Lieutenant Dymally, Speaker John A. Pérez stated, “I was deeply saddened to learn former Lieutenant Governor Merv Dymally passed away. He was an iconic figure in California politics, whose public service spanned nearly six decades in the Legislature, House of Representatives and as Lieutenant Governor of California. Throughout his time in office, he commanded respect on both sides of the aisle, and was a thoughtful and passionate advocate for the men and women he represented and for the poorest and most vulnerable Californians. He will be greatly missed by all those who had the pleasure of knowing him.”

Mervyn Malcolm Dymally was born May 12, 1926 in Cedros, Trinidad and Tobago and served in the California State Assembly from 1963 to 1966, California State Senate from 1967 to 1975, and as the 41st Lieutenant Governor of California from 1975 to 1979.

Along with George L. Brown of Colorado, who was also elected a lieutenant governor in 1974, Dymally was one of the two first Blacks elected to any statewide office in any state since Reconstruction.

Mr. Dymally then successfully ran for the U.S. House of Representatives and served from 1981 to 1993.  As a member of the House of Representatives, he was one of the first persons of African and Indian origin to serve in the U.S. Congress.  After a 10-year retirement, he returned to politics to serve in the California State Assembly from 2002 to 2008.  He is considered the Godfather of African-American politicians in the state of California.

Dymally is survived by his daughter Lynn and son Mark, as well as his wife Alice Gueno Dymally and three sisters.

Funeral services and viewing will be held Wednesday, October 17, 2012 with the viewing between 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon followed by services at 12:30 at the Holy Cross Mortuary, 5835 West Slauson Avenue, Culver City, CA.

Power is in Your Person

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By Marian Wright Edelman

“You know, when we started the farm workers movement, I remember going to many conferences, and people [kept asking] how do we do this? . . . We had to convince people that they have power. Of course, when you say to a farm worker who doesn’t speak the English language, doesn’t have formal education, doesn’t have any assets, doesn’t have any money, that he or she has power, they say, ‘What kind of power do I have?’ And so what we had to convince the workers is you do have power, but that power is in your person. That power is in your person, and when you come together with other workers, other people, and they also understand that they have power, this is the way that changes are made. But you can’t do it by yourself. You’ve got to do it with other people. You’ve got to work together to make it happen.”

As the founder of the Agricultural Workers Association, the co-founder with Cesar Chavez of the United Farm Workers union, and the founder of the Dolores Huerta Foundation for community organizing, Dolores Huerta has spent decades working relentlessly to improve social and economic conditions for farm workers and to fight discrimination in all forms. In the process she has improved the lives of countless children and families, especially poor and immigrant families. Huerta started out with a mission to be a teacher, but quickly realized that most of her students were children of farm workers who lived in poverty. She couldn’t stand seeing the children coming to class hungry and needing shoes and she thought she could do even more to help them by organizing their parents. Huerta’s many successes over the years have proven her right about the power every person can have once they are ready to claim it and work together with others for change.

When Huerta spoke to community and youth leaders at the Children’s Defense Fund’s recent national conference, she shared some of her wisdom from her long legacy of working for justice—starting with the point that the people who need change most are the best ones to make it happen. “The thing that we have to remember is that change comes from the bottom, okay? All of the changes that have been made, whether it's the Civil Rights Movement, the peace movement, the women’s movement, the LGBT movement, the immigrants’ rights movement . . . we can make the change, but it’s got to start with us. The one thing that we have to always tell people is that nobody is going to do this for us. We have to do it for ourselves . . . and the one thing that we know is that the people who are suffering the problems are the ones that have the solutions. The people that are going through the suffering and the discrimination, they are the ones that have the answers to how to solve the problems. So the only thing that we need then are the resources for organizing so that we can share our stories.” In this election year, she also had a reminder about the critical importance of including the electoral process as a piece of organizing: “And, of course, part of the way that we were able to make so many changes for the farm workers . . . is by getting out there and doing the civic work, registering people to vote, going door by door, convincing them you’ve got to vote [or] nothing is going to change. It’s like we’re in a war. We’ve got a war against immigrants. We’ve got a war against women. We’ve got a war against people of color, right? You know, a war against our LGBT community, against unions, and the only weapon that we have as insurance is our vote. And so if we don’t vote, it’s like we’re saying, ‘Okay, you won. I’m not going to fight. You can go ahead and put our kids in jails. You can cut our education. You can cut our health services, and I’ll just let you.’ And so, you know, part of our work – and this is what we did with the farm workers – you have to go out there, and you have to really convince people that their vote matters.”

As she was closing Dolores Huerta shared a Zulu word with the audience, wozani, that’s a call for people to come together in unity. Huerta reminded us that it’s time for all of us committed to pursuing justice for children and the poor to work together in unity and use our power and our votes. If you share, as I do, Mahatma Gandhi’s belief that “there are enough resources in the world for everyone’s need, but not for everyone’s greed,” and if you believe that preventable child poverty, homelessness, hunger, and illiteracy are a moral abomination in our nation with a Gross Domestic Product exceeding $15 trillion and when 400 of our wealthiest Americans made more income in 2008 than the combined revenues of 22 states, then get out to vote and make sure everyone you know does. Our democracy and our children’s futures depend on each of us.

Marian Wright Edelman is President of the Children's Defense Fund whose Leave No Child Behind® mission is to ensure every child a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair Start, a Safe Start and a Moral Start in life and successful passage to adulthood with the help of caring families and communities. For more information go to www.childrensdefense.org.

 

Black Voice News Staff Report

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Black Voice News Staff Report

As the family reels from the sudden and suspicious death of Wanda Mc Glover and as they plan the celebration of her life, they question what really happened on that early Friday morning leading up to her death. McGlover, 68, was found Friday on Brookridge Lane by family members after she did not return from her usual morning walk, according to California Highway Patrol-Temecula area, the investigating agency.

Autopsy results showed that Mc Glover’s injuries are consistent with being hit by a vehicle. As of Friday, the CHP was investigating the death as a felony hit and run, something that Mc Glover’s family states does not seem plausible.

From published reports, McGlover would normally leave early for her morning walk and this particular morning, she was on her cellphone speaking with her daughter. Her daughter states that she heard her mother say “excuse me” and then began screaming. Her daughter contacted Mc Glover’s son who lives with her, who then retraced Mc Glover’s route and found her unconscious in a ditch and called 911.

At press time, the CHP is still investigating the case and asked that anyone with information pertaining to this investigation call the Temecula Area CHP office at (951) 506-2000. The celebration of life for Wanda Mc Glover will be held Sunday, October 14, 2012 at 1:00 PM. The host for this memorial will be the Valley Fellowship Seventh-day Adventist Church, 275 E. Grove Street Rialto, CA 92376.

The family is asking that in lieu of flowers please donate to the Wanda Mc Glover Scholarship Fund, 37235 High Vista Drive, Murrieta, CA 92563.

Safety, Not Timelines, Drives San Onofre

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The San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station near San Clemente, Calif., has been providing safe, clean and reliable electricity for so long you may no longer notice its two domes sitting between the I-5 Freeway and the ocean. For more than 40 years, Southern California Edison (SCE), the majority owner of San Onofre, has been operating this plant, providing clean, emission-free energy to 1.4 million homes and businesses in our region.

Earlier this year, SCE safely shut down Units 2 and 3. Unit 2 was due for planned maintenance and Unit 3 was safely taken offline when the station operators detected a small leak in one of that unit’s almost 20,000 steam generator tubes. Both units at the plant remain safely shut down while we perform thorough inspections, evaluations and corrective actions.

What does all this mean to you, the customers? Without the availability of San Onofre’s power, it has meant some sacrifice during the hot summer months. SCE customers have done a tremendous job in conserving energy this summer by cutting back on air conditioning and the use of other appliances.

SCE employees and independent third-party experts continue to evaluate repair and operation plans, all with the same goal in mind: to ensure that the plant will be able to safely operate under the high standards required by us and the independent Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The safe operation of the plant is our number one priority, and we take this responsibility seriously.

There is a cost associated with all of this. We will first look to steam generator manufacturer warranties and insurance to recover costs associated with the current outages. The California Public Utilities Commission will also review and determine if the costs are reasonable.

We take seriously the responsibility of running the plant safely. Our employees and their families live and work in this community. We are proud of our safety record. We are in the business of safely providing clean and reliable electricity to our customers.

Sponsored by Southern California Edison, an Edison International company ###

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