A+ R A-

News Wire

Flat Rock Walks the Walk to Preserve Slave Cemetery

E-mail Print PDF

By Pureterrah Witcher, Special to the NNPA from The Champion –

A procession of more than 300 people ran, walked, and gathered in Lithonia recently to preserve a cemetery off Lyons Road–a place where more than 200 slaves rest.

Built in 1833, members of the Flat Rock archives and museum say the Flat Rock Slave Cemetery, nestled on a steep hillside in an affluent Lithonia subdivision, is missing a number of headstone markers, security equipment, protective gate lacks, and regular lawn maintenance.

“There are so many improvements we need to make to keep this place from being overtaken by the decay of time,” Johnny Waits said, president of the Flat Rock archives and museum, the organization that hosted the event.

“As the oldest Black town in DeKalb, the historical sites and records of Flat Rock are essential to preserving the county’s past,” Waits said of the cemetery located within the Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area.

Walking through the three-acre cemetery, Waits went on to say the cemetery has been vandalized over the years, but was recently cleaned up by the Greater Atlanta Archeology Society, and mapped and studied by Georgia State University. Paperwork to get the cemetery designated as a national historic site is under review.

Helping to consecrate the cemetery for the first time, U.S. Rep. Hank Johnson, D-GA, spoke to the crowd gathered on Flat Rock Road on the sight of DeKalb ’s oldest Black church, which was torn down in 1971.

“Sometimes it takes stopping and looking back at our achievements to appreciate where we are,” Johnson said to the crowd.

“The future can look hopeless because we don’t take the time to look back, appreciate, and preserve our history. It’s amazing to see the names and dates on the graves,” he added.

Established in antebellum times, Flat Rock appeared on maps in the early 1800s, however, was removed after the Civil War, in 1868.

To pay homage to those buried in the cemetery, the full day of events included a visit by the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Company, the Atlanta Chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers, music from the Georgia Geechee Gullah Shouters, and hourly tours to the Lyon South River Plantation, where participants were able to tour slave quarters and learn about the community from historians.

“It’s great to be able to bring my family out here to see the cemetery - to experience the history and culture. We’ve never seen something like this,” Renee Wright of Lithonia said, who walked with her children in the 5K Benefit Walk.

“I hope this is continued. More people need to know all about this place,” Wright said.

A Reflective President Obama Looks to New Realities of Washington

E-mail Print PDF

By Tony Best, Special to the NNPA from The New York Carib News –

A reflective U.S. President Barack Obama, chastened by the Democratic loss of their majority in the U.S. House of Representatives but buoyed by his party’s ability to hold the Senate has put job creation and accelerating the pace of economic growth at the top of his agenda for the next two years.

Accepting blame, not only for the loss of the House and his party’s reduced strength in the Senate but also for the defeat of at least nine governors across the country, Obama acknowledged that he hadn't done enough to change the culture and ways of doing business in Washington. However, he defended his Administration’s emphasis on health care reform, stimulating the economy and other signature measures, which he insisted were vital to stop the economic free-for-all he had inherited.

Speaking during an hour long news conference at the White House the day after the mid-term elections, the President said that he felt bad about the loss of so many prominent and dedicated public servants who were defeated in House, Senate, and gubernatorial races. But, he vowed to put more Americans back to work and to improve their earning and spending power.

Job creation is an important question for Republicans and Democrats, he told reporters.

The President seemingly took solace in the Democrats ability to retain the Senate by the narrowest of margins, especially the victory by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid in Nevada, a feat which public opinion polls in the two weeks before Tuesday election had put in doubt. Obama vowed to work with both Republicans and Democrats to accelerate the pace of growth.

But the somber atmosphere at the crowded news conference at the White House didn’t extend to Albany in New York as Andrew Cuomo sailed to an overwhelming victory in the race for Governor to succeed David Paterson. The sweet taste of victory enjoyed by Cuomo, who defeated Conservative Republican candidate Carl Paladino by close to a two-to-one margin wasn't the only joyous note for Democrats in the Empire State. Eric Schneiderman handily thumped Dan Donovan, Staten Island District Attorney, to become State Attorney General and Thomas DiNapoli overcame a strong challenge from Republican Harry Wilson to remain State Comptroller.

While the Democrats cruised to an easy victory once again in the Assembly, they may have to wait several days to know if they are going to retain the majority in the State Senate. With the 59 seats declared so far evenly being divided, about three remain to be decided and that could make a difference between sweeping the Republicans or sharing power with them for the next two years.

In Massachusetts, Duval Patrick won a second term as Governor. Once again, New Yorkers voted once again to restrict members of the City Council, the Mayor, Comptroller, Public Advocate and Borough Presidents to two terms. In a referendum, most City voters said two terms was enough.

Newly-Elected Black Republicans – Where Will They Fit?

E-mail Print PDF

By Zenitha Prince, Special to the NNPA from the AFRO-American Newspaper (DC) –

Election Day victories for two Black Republicans raise a rare question in the House of Representatives in the 112th Congress: How will two African American members of the Grand Old Party interact with the Congressional Black Caucus?

Fourteen Black Republicans ran for Congress in the Nov. 2 mid-term elections but, after all the votes were counted, only Tim Scott, a South Carolina businessman, and Allen West, a Florida-based Army veteran of the Iraq War, will take seats. They are the first African-American Republicans to be elected to Congress since 1995.

So far, West has said he wants to be part of the CBC, while Scott is still undecided and is leaning toward not participating.

“It’s really heartening to see this type of diversity demonstrated in African-American representation,” NAACP Washington Bureau Chief Hilary Shelton said. “[Republican Party Chairman] Michael Steele deserves credit for seeing more African-Americans seeking office under the Republican banner.”

He added, “They could be a real asset to the strategy of passing legislation in the House and in advancing the CBC [Congressional Black Caucus] agenda… It’s very difficult to get things through without the cooperation of Democrats and Republicans.”

Not everyone is as sure about the Republican freshmen’s value to the CBC, raising questions about whether Scott and West will choose to join—or even be welcomed—into the caucus, which was created in 1969 as a Capitol Hill advocate for the nation’s African Americans.

While membership is open to all African-American lawmakers, its members have been overwhelmingly Democrats, with only one Republican, Gary Franks of Connecticut, ever becoming a CBC member. Though invited, J.C. Watts, a Black Republican who represented Oklahoma from 1995 to 2003, declined membership. Sen. Edward Brooke, a Massachusetts Republican who served in the Senate from 1967 through 1979, was not publicly invited and refused to join a CBC boycott of President Richard Nixon’s State of the Union address in 1971 although he criticized the Nixon administration’s approach to the Black community and civil rights.

“The name of the group is not the Congressional Black Democratic Caucus, it’s the Black Caucus. [And] if they go back to their founding principles then these two men should be welcomed with open arms,” said Black Republican political strategist Raynard Jackson. But, he predicted, even if they were admitted, “this group will make a hostile environment for another Black [Republican] based on them not being compatible in their philosophical leaning.”

Echoing statements by CBC Chairwoman Barbara Lee, D-Calif., in an Oct. 22 article in The Economist, Maryland Congresswoman Donna Edwards told the AFRO, “If they’re aligned with the interests of working people, particularly African-Americans, who struggle and they want to work with us to advance those interests," Scott and West would be welcomed into the caucus. But, she added, “What I know of them and their agendas, it is difficult for me to see how that would work [though] it might make for some interesting discussions.”

Backed by the national Tea Party and elected to office by mostly White voters, Scott and West have decidedly conservative agendas, including limited government, lowered taxes, and cuts in government spending. Jackson said that, even among GOP ranks, the men are considered to be far, far right of center, making them almost incompatible with the mostly liberal members of the CBC.

“These boys are crazy; they’re Tea Party people,” Jackson told the AFRO. “I’ve had White people calling me up saying these guys are extremely conservative and so far out of the mainstream. Can you see them talking with Maxine Waters? I’d like to be a fly on the wall.”

But, he added, “If I were them, I’d join just to push the issue.”

West, in a Politico interview, indicated his interest in joining the CBC. “That has been a monolithic voice in the body politic for far too long. There is a growing conservative Black voice in this country,” that needs to be heard, West told the publication.

Scott, on the other hand, told Politico he is less willing to join, pointing to his experience in the South Carolina Legislative Black Caucus and the dissonance between him and Black Democrats.

Jackson suggested that the pair also have plenty of dissonance with more moderate Black Republicans.

Moderate Black Republicans are “more concerned with pleasing White people” and less committed to a “Black agenda,” Jackson said. That makes them a detriment to the GOP, rather than an asset, he added.

Though White Republicans are excited by these two additions to the House, saying their victories signal a potential increase in the number of Black conservatives, the new additions will not incite more Blacks to join the party “if they’re saying the same thing White conservatives are saying," Jackson said. "It’s not the messenger; it’s the message. You can’t send a Black to say the same things Pat Buchanan says."

“In a lot of ways,” Jackson added, “it would be better not to have these guys in these positions because it gives the White folks in the party a way out” of having to create real change, “especially if they [Scott and West] have no real power.”

Bush Talks About Kanye West's Katrina Comment

E-mail Print PDF

By Dorothy Rowley, Special to the NNPA from the AFRO-American Newspapers (DC)–

Former President George W. Bush said in a recent NBC interview that the lowest point of his life was when rapper Kanye West made statements in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina that painted Bush as a racist. West’s statement, from five years ago, that “George Bush doesn’t care about Black people,” hit a sore spot with the then-president. During the televised interview in which Bush promoted his memoir, “Decision Points,” set for release in November, he said he didn’t deserve to be labeled as a racist.

“I didn’t appreciate it then. I don’t appreciate it now,” Bush told reporter Matt Lauer. “It’s one thing to say, ‘I don’t appreciate the way he’s handled his business.’ It’s another thing to say, ‘This man’s a racist.’ I resent it, it’s not true and it was one of the most disgusting moments in my presidency.”

Responding to Bush’s comments, West said he definitely understood what it was like to be accused of being a racist “because the same thing happened to me.” West was referring to criticism he garnered during a segment of the 2009 MTV Video Music Awards where he took the microphone from Taylor Swift, who had just won the award for best female video. West, apparently believing that Beyonce should have won, shouted that the hit-making Black singer had been robbed.

“With both situations, it was basically a lack of compassion that America saw,” West reportedly said in a recent interview with a hip-hop radio station in Houston. “With him (Bush), it was a lack of compassion with him not rushing, him not taking the time to rush down to New Orleans,” West continued. “With me, it was lack of compassion for cutting someone off in their moment. I think we’re all quick to pull the race card in America.”

Nevertheless, according to popular columnist Earl Ofari Hutchinson, “The tragedy is that it took West’s racial dig at Bush over Katrina to shame him and the nation about the response” to the devastating hurricane.

In his book, Bush also sheds light on two of the most contentious times of his eight years as commander-in-chief: the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the country’s wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Racist Ad Spending Signals Disaster for DNC and Whitman Campaign

E-mail Print PDF

Special to the NNPA from the California Advocate –

A recent study of campaign advertising expenditures for the November 2010 California gubernatorial election by one of the the nation's leading African American print advertising agency, KimberKimber.com, has revealed major discrepancies between mainstream media, Hispanic media, and African American media outlets by political candidates and political parties nationwide.

These discrepancies are being interpreted as racist and discriminatory in nature by the African American community and can easily be the deciding factor in many elections across the country.

The most glaring examples of these discrepancies were found in the current 2010 California gubernatorial race by Republican candidate Meg Whitman, whose campaign has spent a record $110 million dollars with mainstream and Latino media outlets while spending none of her campaign advertising dollars with African American media outlets. Similarly, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) is spending $50 million dollars in their national "Get Out the Vote" advertising campaign in the next three weeks and none with Black owned media in California. Likewise, California's Democratic candidates have spent an estimated $80 million dollars collectively, and have not spent any of their advertising dollars with Black owned media.

The Kimberkimber.com campaign advertising expenditure research found that between May 2010 and October 1, 2010, none of California gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman's multi-million dollar media budget had been spent with California's African American owned media, compared to the $20 to $25 million dollars spent with Hispanic owned media, and $70 to $75 million dollars spent with White owned or "mainstream" media outlets.

"Despite having a huge media budget and a legitimate appeal to the African American voter, the Whitman campaign has made an infamous historical decision not to market her candidacy to the millions of African American voters in our state", explained Mark Kimber, CEO of Kimber, Kimber and Associates and KimberKimber.com

Further, the Kimberkimber.com study found the DNC and Democrat candidates running for office as being equally racist and discriminatory in their media buys. To date, neither the DNC, nor any statewide Democrat candidate, has placed any media buys with Black owned newspapers in the state of California, despite "bragging" about spending $50 million dollars nationally for a "Get Out the Vote" ad campaign.

"It's an amazing fact that the DNC and Democrat candidates are proving to be the most discriminatory and racist marketers in the history of our nation's elections. How can they (Democrats) spend $50 million dollars on a national 'Get Out the Vote' campaign and ignore their most supportive block of votes; the Black community. Historically, the whole strategy of a `Get Out the Vote' effort has been to target your most supportive base, until now it appears, and unless that base happens to be Black!" stated Kimber.

"We want answers to our questions as to why the African American media is not being utilized by candidates of both the Democrat and Republican parties to reach out to the African American voter. To this date, we have been unsuccessful in getting any response from campaign officials or their advertising agencies, political consultant groups, or pollster firms, currently being paid multi-million dollars by office-seekers, as well as both the Republican and Democrat political parties regarding these issues", stated Kimber.

About KimberKimber.com (Kimber Kimber & Associates): KimberKimber.com is a respected national advertising agency and marketing firm which specializes in African American print media campaigns including campaign development, market research, brand marketing and development, and diversity outreach campaigns. KK&A's expertise has been utilized by national and international corporations, political candidates, and governmental agencies.

Page 294 of 345

Quantcast