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EXTREME HEAT ADVISORY ISSUED – COOLING CENTERS OPEN

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BVN Staff Report

If you’re thinking about exercising, yard work or any other strenuous activity outside, think again. Or at least, be prepared. Temperatures soared to 103 degrees at their highest point in San Bernardino and Fontana Tuesday. The thermometer climbed to 117 in several desert cities Monday. Barstow and Needles saw temperatures at 112 and 115 degrees, respectively.

The sizzling heat is expected to stick around, prompting the county and weather forecasters to issue an extreme-heat advisory and cooling centers to gear up for more visitors. San Bernardino County Health Officer Dr. Maxwell Ohikhuare issued an extreme heat-advisory Monday for San Bernardino County urging people to limit outdoor work to early morning or evening. Anyone who needs to be outside for a while in the afternoon should wear lightweight or loose-fitting clothing and drink lots of water to avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke. The most vulnerable are the elderly, those who work outdoors, infants and children, the homeless or poor and people with chronic medical conditions.

Do not leave children and pets unattended in vehicles because car interiors can reach lethal temperatures quickly, Ohikhuare said. Residents should check on elderly relatives and neighbors. Anyone overcome by the heat should be moved to a cool and shaded location, and 911 should be called. There are plenty of cooling centers offering air conditioning, refreshments and activities close to home. Call 211 for cooling center locations. Senior citizens, some who do not have air conditioning at home, have been turning up at the Fifth Street and Perris Hill senior centers in San Bernardino for relief. “We had several dozen seniors show up here Monday," said Linda Wilson Gomez, supervisor for both centers.

At Inland Center Mall - another cooling center – people came in, had some free iced tea and cookies, did some shopping, ate at the restaurants and cooled down, said Aaron Fields, a clothing store manager.

The heat is unpleasant and dangerous but in some ways it’s good for the economy said Fields. “It gets people away from the television, out of the house – spending money.”

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