A+ R A-

Comedy’s New Color-line breaking show “Static” Picks Up Where “In Living Color” Dropped Off

E-mail Print PDF

Share this article with a friend
In the Spring 1990 a new show called "In Living Color" premiered on Fox with a novel approach to sketch comedy:  having a predominantly Black cast performing controversial comic bits about Whites, Blacks, Asians, gays, and straights. 

Nearly 20 years later, there's a new show ready to cross the comedy color line. "Static" is a new sketch comedy show that features a predominantly Black cast of unknowns whose brand of humor takes no prisoners.   "Static" doesn't floss a double-edged satirical sword like "In Living Color" or later spinoffs like MADtv and "Chapelle's Show."  "Static" mines the world of pop culture for subjects to parody like its predecessors, but it does with a slow burn. 

"Static" also mixes up the madness with some funny animated characters and on-location comedy sketches that make you laugh out loud.   "Static" - which means producing stationary charges of electricity - charges you up with laughter by satirizing weight-conscious white girls, money-hungry Black ministers, wannabe back in the hood Black preppies and many more.  The word is out on this Internet-based show.  The website, www.staticyabastard.com, logs in hundreds of hits a day without any marketing.

"We're not dangerous, but we are defiant because we want to exert the force of comedy on everyday life; that's what Static comedy is," said Maurice Lockhart, writer and co-creator of Static. "We're like an "In Living Color" crossed with "Jackass" except we don't do anything to hurt ourselves.  But we're crazy, and we're the only predominantly Black comedy show out there appealing to a multiracial audience."

 "Static" is the brainchild of three multitalented men who have formed Professional Hood Entertainment.  Lockhart is the company's C.E.O. and writer. His baby bro Bryan Bostic is the editor and musical engineer and Jeff Gordon is a co-writer and director.  The triple threat are as talented and as they are resourceful. They pooled their finances and came up with about $20,000 to become independent producers, turning intense creativity into immense opportunity to become a new comedy show.

"Each of us had our own strengths and interests, but everyone had to jump in and do triple duty," said Gordon, the writer-director.  "We acted; we did location scouting; we did craft services; we did everything just like Robert Townsend in ‘Hollywood Shuffle.'"

Bostic is the quiet storm in the group who's responsible for creating the original hip hop beats that give "Static" a fresh new urban vibe.  "Right now we're showcasing on the Internet, but we're being approached by studios to take it to the next level," said Bostic.  "We're really grateful that the website is a hit and that people like our work"

You are not currently authorized to post comments.

Quantcast

BVN National News Wire