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Legacy Roundtable Challenges IE Educators

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INLAND EMPIRE

 

Six years following passage of the No Child Left Behind Act; Legacy Roundtable, a Southern California based African-American Think Tank, declares the African-American male an endangered species within the college preparatory classroom. Parents and educators remain equally aware of the achievement gap and continue to struggle with a sound solution to boost poor academic performance and statistics. The US Department of Education 2008 California Progress Report cites African-American 8th grade math proficiency scores in a heat for dead last at 18 percent.

Despite the disparaging statistics, African-American females are graduating from institutions of higher education at increasing rates, however the college campus remains an unfamiliar setting for her male counterpart. Through a cooperative effort, Legacy Roundtable has teamed up with local colleges, churches and community based organizations to answer the call of this forgotten scholar.

With an established goal of 500 African-American males in Calculus By 2012; Southland colleges accept the Legacy Roundtable Challenge via continued support of the 2008 Accelerated Summer Mathematics Academy (ASMA) hosted by: Mt. San Antonio College, Chaffey College and UCR. ASMA is a free eight-week intensive learning experience targeting middle school African-American males who demonstrate good academic standings (+2.0 GPA) and provide evidence of their enrollment in geometry. Classes will be held Monday through Thursday beginning June 23rd and ending on July 31st.

Phase one ASMA classes will be held at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut, California and Chaffey College located in Fontana, California. Accepted scholars will be immediately enrolled into a college level Intermediate Algebra course offered and instructed by Mt. San Antonio professors. The ASMA curriculum also includes a two-week intensive mathematics review aimed to assist scholars with the mandatory placement exam. This effort is then followed by six weeks of care, nurturing, development and qualified mathematic instruction. Students who complete phase one with passing scores will be eligible to receive college credits.

Phase two of the program includes a one-week residential component hosted by the University of California Riverside and awarded to the top 25 Southern California scholars based upon recommendations of program personnel. Referrals from parents, counselors, teachers, principals, school administrators, community leaders and churches are invited. Applications will be reviewed during April and scholars will be notified of their selection by mid-May 2008.

In addition to the goal of enrolling 500 African American scholars into Calculus by the year 2012, Legacy Roundtable seeks to equip and reinforce the basic math skills needed to compete inside and outside of the classroom.


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