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Classification of Arrogance

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Joseph A. Bailey, II, M.D.
Amazingly, in reviewing the indexes of my 300 psychology, sociology, and psychiatry books, only one mentioned the word "arrogance." So what are European males trying to hide? The one book said this one line. The expansive type of Aggression is subdivided into three major groups: the Narcissistic; the Arrogant-Vindictive; and the Perfectionistic types. These three are acquired as part of socialization; are part of the following four types of the Arrogant--Types I, II, III, and IV-representing the Extreme, Moderate, Slight, and Mild respectively; and their common features are present in appropriate degrees. Being "normal" at birth, one type destined to be arrogant soon experience a loss of power that develops into an Inferiority Complex. This is a Selfhood filled with a sense of inadequacy and insecurity resulting from a lack of self-confidence in certain aspects that one deems significant to them in getting through the maze of life. Such a lack of Self-Confidence either destroys or prevents from forming those Selfhood props related to Self-Respect, Self-Regard, Self-Appreciation, Self-Trust, Self-Responsibility, Self-Reliance, and Self-Efficacy. To overcome these lacks or losses, afflicted individuals develop a Superiority Complex-a mindset that is never secure because the afflicted know their claims were not earned. It shows in varying degrees of destruction that can range from constant to periodic.

A second type is where the newborn is treated as a "little god" and this continues throughout their lives. As a result, they are called "Aristocentric"-meaning they have an inordinate claim to a false superiority and have retained their Infantile "selfishness"-a phase composed of "self" and "ended" and "self" and "full." The idea is that one is full of one's own self-interest and is oriented to pursue that interest as an end for one's life. Throughout history, people-mainly of the upper social class-- who believe special privileges are owed them, reflect narcissistic entitlement. Thus, they expect to always be treated as VIPs (an abbreviation for "Very Important Persons") and are morbidly (unhealthily) interested in themselves. Both are about extreme concern for the self and lack of concern for others. From failing to mature out of a childish state they (and those with an Inferiority Complex) have the features of Brutes.

Type I despise good people; are fiercely vindictive; are haters of those who are not like them; are aggressive toward those who challenge them; are suspicious and distrustful of fellow brutes; and intensely seek money and material pleasures.  Devoid of a sense of fair play and moral "rightness," they are perpetrators of hate and evil.  All four types are deluded and show envious, jealous, boaster, prideful, unappreciative, disobedient, mean, stubborn, false accuser, untrustworthy, and power hungry behaviors. They expect others to be perfect in dealing with them and say: "read my mind and do what I want"; "Do as I say but don't do what I do"; and "I'll judge you but don't you judge me." People with an arrogant superiority complex are "seldom right but never in doubt." By seeing themselves as having "more than" others, they develop an arrogant attitude characterized by:  (1) an excessive need for recognition and praise; (2) being hypersensitive to even mild criticism; (3) overzealousness and excessive conscientiousness in personally performing or having others perform relatively unimportant duties; (4) self-centeredness, as in monopolizing the conversation (especially about oneself); (5) lack of interest in what others are saying to the extent of cutting them off in mid-sentence; (6) failing to show compassion, caring, and empathy for others; (7) the "do it my way or the highway" attitude; and (8) "I build myself up while I tear you down." In summary, arrogance is way "too much" about oneself and way "too little"-if anything-about others.



website: www.jablifeskills.com

Joseph A. Bailey, II, M.D.

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