A+ R A-

Ushering A New Era of American Broadcasting

E-mail Print PDF

Share this article with a friend
By Willie E. Gary
CEO & Chairman of the MBC Network


In 1864, just months before the abolishment of slavery, America’s first Black daily newspaper was published. This progressive experiment, and subsequent media effort geared toward the African American experience, would change the world’s view of the struggle for civil rights and social justice.

Information presented from an African American perspective quickly became an effective tool in bridging the gap between America’s majority population and its disenfranchised Black community, allowing African Americans to assert -- and circulate -- the idea that the next great moment in history could be their own.

A clear niche, as well as a necessity, for information outlets focusing on the Black experience continues to exist. To meet this need, the Major Broadcasting Cable Network (MBC), an African American owned and operated cable network, has announced plans to launch a 24-hour news channel directed toward African American viewers. Since its inception more than four years ago, MBC has provided intelligent, family-oriented programming.

“MBC News: The Urban Voice” will undoubtedly become the single most important destination for viewers seeking accurate, up-to-date and relevant information about how the news of the day impact the African American community. In an effort to empower and educate, “MBC News” will chronicle the daily social, political, cultural, and economic reality of African American communities.

On average, statistics show about 70 percent of African American homes are tuned into television during primetime, compared to 61 percent of White viewers. African Americans watch approximately 73.6 hours of television per week -- some 22 hours more than non-African American households. “MBC News” will provide a much-needed programming alternative that will propel the television industry forward with information that focuses on this growing television audience.

Just as MBC has carved its niche in providing programming that does not glorify sex, violence, materialism or misogyny, “MBC News” will feature African Americans in a fair and balanced manner while disseminating critical and relatable information. For example, financial news will not simply monitor the market, it will include information about how the market effects the African American community in an effort to turn home renters into homeowners.

Health news will address specific issues such as heart disease, obesity, sickle cell anemia and AIDS that affect African Americans differently and disproportionately. MBC News will also focus on the positive achievements of African Americans.

MBC is working to ensure that network programming portrays minority images and increases minority participation in front of and behind the cameras. Negative stereotypes are often unwittingly reinforced through standard journalism.

In contemporary American society, stereotypes are reinforced through the images portrayed on film and television.
Because of this, the depiction of Blacks on television fails to move forward in a meaningful way.

Four years ago, MBC began changing all that.
Today, “MBC News” will take the next step in changing the way Blacks are perceived on television by presenting a fair and balanced look at African American communities. We will balance the scales of public opinion by reporting about the success that lies within the Black community, thus changing public opinion on a variety of issues and perceptions.

Nearly a century and a half ago the emergence of Black newspapers helped change the course of American policy. It is in this spirit that MBC launches its latest innovative media effort. “MBC News” begins this fall -- ushering in a new era of American broadcasting.

You are not currently authorized to post comments.

Quantcast