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Stewardship – Giving Wealth Wisely

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In the course of writing these articles on wealth, I have received emails asking how people can distribute their wealth for the good of the community.  For this article I am going to divide charitable giving into four categories:

1. Business Assistance

2. Educational Assistance

3. General Community Assistance

4. Family Assistance

The only way that the Black Community can truly create business wealth is to create funds that provide capital to Black businesses.  For our purposes we will oversimplify and divided these funds into two type, venture capital funds and business assistance funds. 

Venture capital funds are for profit funds.  These funds are designed to make money for their investors.  They essentially invest in potentially high-risk and high-growth businesses.  Venture capital funds have been behind the explosive growth of technology in the United States technology.

I am using the term business assistance funds to describe funds that are not for profit and provide loans (including microloans) and grants to businesses.  Loans have to be paid back while grants do not.

2.  Educational Assistance

Educational assistance can take the form of scholarships and fellowships.  Scholarships are monies given to students to be used to pay for the cost of their education.  With the rising cost of private schools, scholarships can be provided to students of all ages, from elementary through college.  Fellowships are funds provided to the school, college or university. 

3.  General Community Assistance

This is the money that we give to churches, civic organizations (NAACP, Urban League, etc.) community based organizations, fraternal organizations and professional organizations (Black MBA's, Doctors, Attorneys, Data Processors, Accountants, etc.).  There are so many needs in our community that finding an organization to give money to is not a problem.

4.  Family Assistance

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Kevin Martin
We all want to help our families, but as I have pointed out in previous articles, providing and unexpected lump sum of money usually leads to wasteful spending.  It is often better to provide our wealth to our family members via a living will or trust.  (I am not a financial advisor so you probably want to speak with a professional for more details). 

The legal definition of a trust is a fiduciary relationship in which one person (the trustee) holds the title to property (the trust estate or trust property) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary). (see www.dictionary.com - definition 9 under Law).

The basic concept is to ensure that your child or relative uses the money as a down payment on a home, to further their education, to invest, or to start a business, rather than just for buying a new car.

Money can be given to any or all of these categories, depending on your interests and desires.  The key is to begin planning to pass your wealth on now.


Kevin Martin grew up in Riverside and is interested in discussing specific actions for improving the Black community.  Comments can be sent to   by1989@pacificnet.net.   This account receives a great deal of spam so be sure to include this article's title or blackvoicenews in your subject line.

First 5 Presents “Leading Ladies” for School Readiness

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RIVERSIDE

By Marti Taylor


Members of the California Association of Ministers‚ Wives and Widows are spreading the good word of early childhood development through a partnership with First 5 California.

The two groups joined forces to create Leading Ladies for School Readiness, a statewide campaign specifically targeting African-Americans.

Established in 1999, First 5 focuses on early development of children ages 0 to five, based on studies that indicate children function better when exposed to positive emotional, physical and intellectual reinforcement during those years. Since its inception, First 5 has provided youngsters and their families with a range of  health and early learning services.

But with the African-American community suffering from the highest infant mortality rate in the state and only 37 percent of its children enrolled in preschool, First 5 representatives enlisted the help of the Black church to spread the message about the importance of school readiness to African-American families.

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L To R Patricia Calloway of Refreshing Springs Community Church, Brenda Davis of Refreshing Springs Church, Regina Hamilton of Refreshing Springs Community Church, Miriam Fredrick of Eagles Wings Christian Church, Patricia Wiggins of Eagles Wings Christian Church, Rhonda Ellison of Kansas Ave SDA, and Gladys Coward of Eagles Wings Christian Church.
The Leading Ladies' mission is to supply African-American parents and caregivers with the necessary tools.


"More and more African-American children are entering preschool unprepared," said Monique Brackett, Assistant Account Executive for BaumanCurry, in charge of African-American outreach for First 5 California. "It's about nurturing--reading to them out loud, having them hold crayons--not just letting them sit in front of the T.V. and watch Sesame Street."


Using African-American churches to disseminate that information to Black communities was a natural choice according to Mrs. Brackett.



"The African American community has always looked to faith leaders for guidance and advice when others rely on family members or politicians," said Mrs. Brackett. "In the Black community, pastors are considered a trusted source of information."


The organization is sending the message using methods such as advertising in Black newspapers, making public service announcements, and sponsoring radio gospel shows.

Although Leading Ladies is faith-based, Mrs. Brackett said one doesn't have to be affiliated with a church in order to benefit from the program.

"We'll be holding seminars and they'll be either in churches or community centers, but they're open to everyone," said Mrs. Brackett. "Our goal is to teach the African-American community about early childhood healthcare and education, benefits beyond the walls of the church."

The statewide campaign was launched in February after two years of collaboration between the church leaders and First 5.

During that time, the team created the Outreach Tool Kit equipped to assist Leading Ladies in their outreach efforts.

"The kit is a comprehensive guide to help members be strong school readiness advocates," said Mrs. Brackett. "It has talking points to assist us in hosting school readiness seminars, teaches us how to organize community forums, has answers to frequently asked questions, and is a resource for church and media outreach information."

The tool kit also comes with a CD-ROM with helpful tips for parents, including a list of websites for different services, that can be downloaded, printed and distributed.

The organization will be holding a parents workshop Wednesday, May 9  from 11:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the San Bernardino First 5 office, 330 N. D Street, fifth floor.

A Leading Ladies workshop will take place Friday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the First 5 Riverside office, 2002 Iowa Ave., Suite 100.

Lunch will be served at both events and are free and open to the public.

For more information about Leading Ladies for School Readiness, visit the California Association of Ministers‚ Wives and Widows' website at info@leadingladiesforschoolreadiness.com or call (866) 305-4813 or contact Mrs. Brackett at (323) 525-0559 ext. 237.

McLeod Names Patricia Green-Lee Woman of the Year

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SAN BERNARDINO

 

The founder of a non-profit that fights domestic violence and HIV/AIDS has been named the 32nd District's Woman of the Year by Senator Gloria Negrete McLeod (D-Inland Empire).

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Patricia Green
Patricia Green-Lee, CEO and founder of the Rialto-based Brothers and Sisters in Action (BASIA), was honored in a ceremony at the State Capitol earlier this month in recognition of her work in the African-American community.

"This was a difficult process because there are so many women who work incredibly hard to make their communities a better place," Negrete McLeod said. "Even so, Patricia Green-Lee stands out. She uses her own experience to reflect the reality of domestic violence and HIV."

Green-Lee holds a Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science and Human Services and is certificated in substance abuse and domestic violence, Negrete McLeod said.

 "Besides all of her work with BASIA, Patricia's expertise and support were instrumental in the success of a domestic violence town hall I sponsored last year," Negrete McLeod said.

Green-Lee said she was shocked when she heard she was named Woman of the Year.

"I was totally surprised. When I found out, I started screaming and hollering and my kids were saying, ‘what's the matter, mama?'" Green-Lee said. "I just kept saying, ‘not me, not me.' I am still in shock."

Green-Lee started BASIA in 2003 but her activism started back in 1989 when she found out her son had HIV.

"I felt so ignorant about HIV and AIDS. When he first came home I was afraid of him, afraid of getting HIV. In 2007, I see a lot of people that still feel the same way," she said.

BASIA provides HIV/AIDS education to teach family members that the autoimmune disease can not be contracted through typical contact. As the non-profit has evolved, it has also provided prevention and intervention resources to African Americans in San Bernardino County.

The Woman of the Year ceremony is the centerpiece of a day-long celebration that includes a morning reception and lunch with all state legislators and each of their Women of the Year selections.

The day's events is sponsored by the Legislative Women's Caucus, of which Negrete McLeod is vice-chair.

McLeod Names Patricia Green-Lee Woman of the Year

E-mail Print PDF
SAN BERNARDINO

 

The founder of a non-profit that fights domestic violence and HIV/AIDS has been named the 32nd District's Woman of the Year by Senator Gloria Negrete McLeod (D-Inland Empire).

Image
Patricia Green
Patricia Green-Lee, CEO and founder of the Rialto-based Brothers and Sisters in Action (BASIA), was honored in a ceremony at the State Capitol earlier this month in recognition of her work in the African-American community.

"This was a difficult process because there are so many women who work incredibly hard to make their communities a better place," Negrete McLeod said. "Even so, Patricia Green-Lee stands out. She uses her own experience to reflect the reality of domestic violence and HIV."

Green-Lee holds a Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science and Human Services and is certificated in substance abuse and domestic violence, Negrete McLeod said.

 "Besides all of her work with BASIA, Patricia's expertise and support were instrumental in the success of a domestic violence town hall I sponsored last year," Negrete McLeod said.

Green-Lee said she was shocked when she heard she was named Woman of the Year.

"I was totally surprised. When I found out, I started screaming and hollering and my kids were saying, ‘what's the matter, mama?'" Green-Lee said. "I just kept saying, ‘not me, not me.' I am still in shock."

Green-Lee started BASIA in 2003 but her activism started back in 1989 when she found out her son had HIV.

"I felt so ignorant about HIV and AIDS. When he first came home I was afraid of him, afraid of getting HIV. In 2007, I see a lot of people that still feel the same way," she said.

BASIA provides HIV/AIDS education to teach family members that the autoimmune disease can not be contracted through typical contact. As the non-profit has evolved, it has also provided prevention and intervention resources to African Americans in San Bernardino County.

The Woman of the Year ceremony is the centerpiece of a day-long celebration that includes a morning reception and lunch with all state legislators and each of their Women of the Year selections.

The day's events is sponsored by the Legislative Women's Caucus, of which Negrete McLeod is vice-chair.

County Educator Named Woman of the Year in the 62nd Assembly District

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SACRAMENTO

 

Linda Miranda, a top San Bernardino County educator, was honored at the State Capitol Monday, March 5 as Woman of the Year for the 62nd Assembly District.  

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Assembly Speaker Fabian Nuñez and Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter present award to Linda Miranda (center) at Woman of the Year Event.
Miranda, Special Assistant to the Superintendent of San Bernardino County Schools, was chosen as honoree by 62nd District Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter.

"She represents the salt of the earth of women in my district," said Assembly Member Carter, who honored Miranda in a formal ceremony on the floors of the Senate and Assembly.  "Education has been a big part of her life. She knows how hard she has to work in a position that impacts the lives of so many young people. She is someone that young people can learn from and admire."

As special assistant to the superintendent, Miranda serves as a direct communication and resource liaison between the county superintendent, community members and community-based groups in order to foster school safety.  She works with the Alliance for Education which is a school/business labor partnership.

Miranda has about 20 years of direct experience working with numerous diverse community groups, organizations, boards and elected officials to improve educational, business and community opportunities for the Inland Empire region. Among her professional and service activities, she is past president of the Inland Empire Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and past treasurer with the Hispanic Educational Advancement Foundation and treasurer of the Inland Counties Hispanic Roundtable.

According to Herbert R. Fischer, CountySuperintendent, Miranda is a "strong advocate for assuring all students, particularly underrepresented students, are granted the highest quality educational opportunities."

In 2000, the League of Women Voters recognized Miranda with their Citizen of Achievement Award. In 1999, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors presented her with the Outstanding Small Business Advocate Award and Hispanic Lifestyle Magazine named her among those recognized as Most Influential-Making a Difference in the region.

Miranda has served as administrative secretary for the Business Services division of SBCSS since 1999 and prior to that was executive administrative assistant for Matich Corporation. She is a graduate of ColtonHigh School and mother of two children.

The annual Woman of the Year event was started in 1987 by former Assembly Members Bev Hansen and Sally Tanner. They noticed that the California Legislature had no events planned for the month of March, which is Women's History Month. In celebration of the contributions to society made by remarkable women statewide, Hansen and Tanner arranged to invite one woman from each Senate and Assembly district to come to the Capitol   and be honored for their accomplishments.

Carter has a strong connection to education. She is the first living woman in the Inland Empire for whom a high school has been named.  She worked for two years at the university as a legislative and community liaison and was honored by the CSUSB Alumni Association as its Distinguished Alumna in 1981. Amina was elected to four four-year terms on the Rialto Board of Education from 1983 through 1999.

For 23 years beginning in 1973, she was a fixture in local communities as part of Congressman George Brown's staff, including her position as district director.

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