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Art & Culture

2004 Washington Descendents Visit Riverside

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1. Margaret Washington Clifford is the granddaughter and oldest living direct descendant.  She resides in Atlanta, Georgia and is a retired from the field of education. She is the owner and operator of Washington Candy Company, where she hand makes, packages and distributes all of her products.

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. 2005 Brunch Keynote Speaker

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Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. was born June 9, 1962 in Washington D.C.  He is the great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington and the great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass.  He spent the first 8 years of his life in Washington D.C. until his family packed up and moved to California in 1970. 

BerniE

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About the Artist:   
                                                           
Colorful expression and artistic zeal has become the way BerniE. renders his subjects in a strong, graphic fashion through a variety of mediums.  He purposely alludes a distinctive style in order to provide his collectors with an array of choices and styles. 


The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords

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By Tony Seybert
Journalist and Photo Editor
Daily Sundial
California State University--Northridge

1827-1861: Origins of the Black Press

Freedom's Journal, the first Black newspaper in the United States, started as a weekly abolitionist journal in 1827. It was the result of a meeting in New York City of Black leaders, who realized that such a publication was important to efforts towards uniting free Blacks against slavery.

The Black Voice News: An Open Door to the Community for Three Decades

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In 1980, Hardy and Cheryl Brown bought The Black Voice News and formed Brown Publishing Company.  They had been active community leaders and budding community journalists.   Hardy was known as the City Editor of the Black Voice News and The American News.  And Cheryl, the first Black planner in the county of San Bernardino, was known for her journalistic contributions o­n community events, religious events, and later her published images of the famous and not-so-famous.  As young publishers, they worked every week, often spending late hours at the office, never missing a deadline.


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