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Commentary

Eyes & Ears of Moreno Valley

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Juanita Barnes
HELLO MORENO VALLEY

Moreno Valley this is the week that we will celebrate our “Black History Celebration.” Saturday March 14, 2009. The Parade starts at Cottonwood and Fredrick 10:00 a.m.  and ends at Center point at Towngate Shopping Center11:00 a.m.  to 5: p.m. Tell your friends and family.  There are still openings for vendor, and parade space. 2625 Fredrick. The celebration will be from

The “Foundation For Kids” in Moreno Valley, a nonprofit that helps abused and at risk children in southern California, recently received $4,000.00 from several branches of Wells Fargo Banks in Moreno Valley and Riverside. In 2008, it is stated that the nonprofit organization served 3,690 children in Moreno Valley and Riverside by donating Christmas gifts, food, toys, books and clothing. The money will be used to purchase other items for children in the area.

“Inland Empire the “Inland Empire Buffalo Soldiers Heritage Association Bronze Statue Committee.” proudly presents its Second Annual Breakfast Fundraiser. (proceeds to benefit 9th & 10th Buffalo Soldiers Memorial) Join them for a delicious meal of: seasonal fruit/belgian waffles freshly brewed coffee or assorted teas, assorted bagels and cream cheese, sausage or bacon or ham, scrambled eggs and juices. Donation $ 10.00 per person. Date: April 4th 2009.  Time 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

“WHERE” Camper Resorts of America 375 Ramona Expressway Perris, Ca. (Exit 215 Freeway on to Ramona express heading East.)

Ticket information call: Doris (951) 679 – 0577, Gilbert (951) 657 -   7088, Phil (951) 367 – 9284, Rosia (951) 672 – 8320 or Wilbert (951) 657 – 9585. The IEBSHA thanks you for your support.

Be Blessed

JB

Ambiguous Messages to Our Youth

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Richard O. Jones
Ladies and gentlemen of the church, let us stop confusing our youth. Recently, I witnessed a teenager wearing his baseball cap while in church service. I was not surprised, though a bit disappointed that none of the ushers, men, or pastor asked the young man to remove his cap. Being led by proper manners, I ignored the voice to leave him alone and instead discreetly went to the young man. I informed him that it was improper for a male to wear a hat in church. Actually, I was taught that a man should remove his hat when he enters a building, but I didn’t go there. After giving me a brief look of disbelief, he removed his cap.

It suddenly occurred to me that just a couple weeks prior was Black History Month and many of the adult males wore African attire including the Kofia (African hat), which included the pastor. Perhaps the young mans’ confused look questioned why are Kofias accepted and not his baseball cap. In fact, if he had asked me that question, I would have replied that the Kofia was spiritual wear, which gave it immunity. That’s the answer I was given nearly 40 years ago when the Kofia first became fashionable in America.

However, to tell to whole truth, I’ve seen the Kofia wore in every unholy facet of life imaginable.  Personally, I don’t think there’s anything particularly holy about the Kofia and the reason men don’t remove it in churches is because of fashion and not holiness as I once heard said at a Kwanzaa Ceremony in the 70s.

Perhaps the vagueness of what is acceptable versus unacceptable is confusing to our youth. For a man not to remove his hat inside of a church is disrespectful to the sacredness of the church as far as I am concerned unless you’re the pope, a priest, or clergy and wearing a head piece, hat, Kofia, or whatever as a part of your sacred apparel.

In the same church service, I noticed a young female with tattoos on her exposed cleavage. It occurred to me that tattoos on females are as acceptable as males wearing earrings and ponytails. In fact, there are grandmothers in the church now getting tattoos for the first time, although the Bible specifically speaks against it. Recently on the

evening news there was a segment that introduced the new Barbie Doll with a tattoo. Of course this is the beginning of preschoolers being branded with tattoos. Don’t believe it? Just watch! I am now beginning to see young females wear their pants far below their waist to churches, with a second part of pants beneath, as the misguided males

have been doing for a couple decades.

Has everything and anything become acceptable to the church?  Have God given some Christians over to a reprobate mind as spoken in Romans 1: 28. Should our churches teach proper etiquette?

Email: richardojones1@verizon.net

Eyes & Ears of Moreno Valley

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Juanita Barnes
This is something I read today it simply says; “Can You Say.” Can you say in parting with the Day that’s slipping fast. That you helped a single person. Of the many you have passed? Is a single life rejoicing over what you did or said? Does someone whose hopes were fading now with courage look ahead? Did you waste the day or lose it? Was it well spent or poorly spent? Did you leave a trend or kindness? Or a scar of discontent? As you close your eyes in slumber. Do you think that God would say? You have made the world much better. Read your “Word prayerful and think.”

HELLO MORENO VALLEY

Moreno Valley as we celebrated Black history last month, I would like to share with you some history that Mr. Bill Barr, a marketing professional, shared with me.

Black History celebrations began in 1926 as a result of the lack of documentation (history) of Black accomplishments. Black History week was founded by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. The purpose of this celebration is to share, not only Black accomplishments but Black heritage, in an effort to educate/ inform the uninformed and help foster unity in the community.  Although the celebrations have been attended mostly by Black Americans, it is for everyone. This year marks the 23rd year of celebrations in the City of Moreno Valley. We solicit the participation of all the residents and surrounding areas. Please come out and enjoy the parade and share in the festivities.

Moreno Valley will be celebrating Contributions And Change In History, Saturday, March 14th 2009. The parade starts at 10:00 a.m. at Cottonwood & Fredrick.  8th Annual Parade. 23rd Annual Black History Celebration. 7th Annual Martin Luther King Jr.  Celebration. This year’s Grand Marshal is Ms. Cynthia Wilson, founder of the Wilsonnettes Drill Team. Come out and enjoy live entertainment, vendors, cultural displays and food. If you are interested in participating in the parade, contact at (951) 697–7772 or E-mail mvbcc4@yahoo.com.  Decently & In Order Ministry will present its ninth Annual Inland Empire Pastors Breakfast on Saturday, March 28th beginning at 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the National Orange Show Events Center. Tickets are $30.00 per person.  For tickets or information, contact (909) 425–1777, (909) 881–5551 or (909) 425–2053. The keynote speaker will be Dr. Danny Carroll, Senior Pastor, Water Of Life. Evangelist Jerry Musgrove and many other pastors will meet you there.

Be Blessed
JB

A Moment in Black History: The Patterson Car -- Part 2 of 2

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Richard O. Jones
In any case, the touring cars and roadsters were said to be mechanically superior to the “Tin Lizzie” Model T produced by Henry Ford.  Special features advertised by the firm included full floating rear axle, cantilever spring, de-mountable rims, left-hand drive, center control, electric starting and lighting system, one-man top, and ventilating windshield. “Our special motor has that surplus power and greatest pull,” an ad boasted. “Try it on your test hill.”

The autos were powered by four-cylinder Continental engines and were said to be ca pable of speeds of 50 mph. Both Patterson models were priced at about $850.  While entering the competitive world of auto manufacturing, the Patterson Co. continued to turn out wagons and advertise for farm repair work.

Few automobiles were manufactured.  Production estimates range from 30 to about 150 cars.  Apparently there was a better market for cus tom-bodied vehicles, as Fred Patterson decided to cease production of the cars and concentrate his efforts on such products as buses, hearses, moving vans, and trucks for hauling ice, milk and baked goods.

The buses and trucks had wood framing with metal skins. They were mounted on Ford, Dodge and Chevrolet chassis until the company shifted to an all-steel body around 1930.

For a time this strategy proved quite success ful. Patterson buses were the first to travel the streets of Cincinnati, and other vehicles were shipped as far away as Haiti.  The Patterson Co. was one of the first to manufacture two-wheeled trailers in the mid-1930’s.

The combination of Detroit’s mass production and the Depression dealt a fatal blow to the company in the 1930’s. Unable to raise suffi cient operating capital in Greenfield, the family accepted an offer to relocate in Gallipolis.  The firm changed its name to the Gallia Body Co. and operated there for about a year before lack of financial support and a shortage of experi enced workers caused the firm to cease opera tions.

Only in recent years has the Patterson family received much notice for its remarkable achievements in the manufacture of motorized vehicles. An exhibit in Philadelphia and a salute during Black History Month a few years ago have helped alert others to the remarkable ac complishments of former slave C.R. Patterson and his son, Fred.

Email: richardojones1@verizon.net

A Moment in Black History: The Patterson Car -- Part 1 of 2

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Richard O. Jones
Mr. Charles Richard Patterson was founder of what was to become the world’s first Blackowned automobile manufacturing company. Greenfield, Ohio holds a special place in the annals of automobile manufacturing, thanks to an ex-slave and his family. During the early part of this century, the Greene Countrie Towne was home to the only Black-owned and operated automobile manufacturing enterprise known to have existed.

The head of this remarkable family was Charles (Rich) Patterson. He was born a slave on a West Virginia plantation and learned black smithing skills that would prove useful throughout his life. Patterson escaped to freedom shortly before the Civil War by hiking over the Allegheny Mountains and swimming the Ohio River. Another chronicler states that Patterson settled in Greenfield in 1865 but makes no mention of a dramatic escape. In any event, Patterson quickly established a reputation as a fine blacksmith.  In 1873 he went into partnership with a white man, J.P. Lowe.

Patterson assumed sole ownership a decade later upon the death of his partner. The C.R. Patterson Co. turned out 28 different types of horse-drawn vehicles. The product

line included buggies, backboards, phaetons, rockaways and surreys — the era’s most popular wagons.

Patterson and his wife, the former Josephine Qutz, were the parents of four children: Katherine, Dollie, Frederick, and Samuel. It was Fred who helped guide the company into the Automobile Age in the early 20th century.

Conflicting information has been published concerning the debut of the Patterson car, also known as the Greenfield touring car. One report states that the company was making cars in 1902, while another writer states that the Patterson-Greenfield made its debut on Sept. 23, 1915.

Email: richardojones1@verizon.net

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