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Lakers Live and Die by Their Swords

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By Eduardo Guzman and Ruben Cervantez
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A long six game series came to an end for the three time defending champs. It seemed like three rings was enough for the Lakers. However, the fourth was just out of reach and not meant to be.

It looked like the Lakers had a chance of winning the series against the San Antonio Spurs. After tying the series 2-2 in game four, game five was a struggle for the Lakers. As Robert Horry’s magic ran out in game five, he couldn’t knock down the game winning shot.

During the series, no Laker could consistently guard “Twin Towers,” Tim Duncan (League Most Valuable Player) and David Robinson. As for the Spurs, game six was huge. Everything was going down hill for the defending champs. No one could stop Duncan -- not even Shaquille O’Neal. Duncan’s confidence grew with each shot.

From the beginning, the Spurs dominated the Lakers. They out rebounded them and also outscored them. David Robinson just might end his career with a second ring on his finger. The Spurs cut the Lakers three year run short after knocking them out of the playoffs with a game six blow out. Spurs 110, Lakers 82. The Lakers were really never in it; they were outrun, out hustled, and out played by a hungrier basketball team.

Some of the games were close, however, the Lakers had to spend so much energy playing catch up that they had nothing left in the tank. The supporting cast did not have enough talent to complement O’Neal and Bryant.

The 2004 version of the Lakers will look completely different. There have been serious talks about adding the best playmaker in the league, Jason Kidd to round out the line-up.

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