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Remembering Fanny Brown

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Fanny Marion Brown was known by her family and friends as Marion. She was a native of California born to Mary & Frank Adams on May 12, 1923, in the city of Monrovia. Marion was the fourth child of eleven chil- dren and had 4 sisters and 6 brothers. She was called home on April 26, 2012.

She attended school in Monrovia and graduated in 1943 from Monrovia Arcadia-Duarte (MAD) High School. She enjoyed visiting with her fami- ly, dancing, country western music, gardening, crocheting, playing bingo & keno, and cooking. She also enjoyed working at the family business, Adams part owner, she was able to show her warmth and love of people.

Marion moved to Riverside with her family in 1944. On November 19, 1949, she married, CMSgt Ellis G. Brown, Sr. (who preceded her in death). Out of this union, they were blessed with 5 children, Deborah Patrice Brown, Ellis G. Brown, Jr. (Doris), Tina Alise (Brown) Robinson (Eddie), Mary Ellen (Brown)–Smith (Mark), and Ronald Kirby Brown (deceased).

Marion is survived by her 3 sisters; Thelma Adams-King, Helen (Adams) Armstrong, & Eunice (Sharon) Adams-Lisberg, her 2 brothers Jerry Adams (Carolyn) & Tim Adams (Mary) and her brother–in-law Rogers Brown. She leaves to cherish her memory, her grandchildren; Ama, Trey, EJ (Eddie IV), Robert and Candies, as well as a host of nieces, nephews relatives and friends.

LONG-TERM UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS TO END – SATURDAY

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BVN Staff Report 

The most generous federal extension program for unemployment benefits, known as FED-ED in California, won’t be available after May 12. About 93,000 people will be immediately affected, according to California’s Employment Development Department (EDD).

“The week ending May 12, 2012, will be the last week EDD can pay FED-ED benefits to eligible unemployed workers, even if someone has a remaining balance on their FED-ED extension,” according to an EDD news release. The federal government took extraordinary steps in 2009 to prop up workers who lost their jobs during the recession. The normal 26 weeks of state benefits were supplemented by three types of federal extensions that added up to 73 more weeks for a total of 99 weeks of benefits, the longest on record.

Since March 2009 when the program began, more than 912,000 unemployed Californians have received $5 billion in payments.

The EDD currently pays about $310 million a week to Californians in regular and federal extension benefits, assisting unemployed workers and their families and helping local businesses where much of these benefits are spent. California’s unemployment hit 11 percent in March — that's three percent higher than the national average.

But while it remains high, the three-month average is not 10 percent higher than it was at this time last year, making California ineligible to continue to provide extended benefits, according to U.S. Department of Labor standards.

More information about the new potential maximum weeks of federal benefit extensions can be found on the EDD website, along with more information on assistance for unemployed workers.

Rwandan Prime Minister Challenges Cal. Baptist Graduates

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University graduated a record number of students

By Chris Levister

The Right Honorable Pierre Damien Habumuremyi, Prime Minister of the Republic of Rwanda, shook hands, kissed babies and reaffirmed his commitment to human rights and the need for widespread political reform throughout Africa during a combined visit to California and to deliver a commencement address at California Baptist University in Riverside.

From the colorful kente cloth sashes worn by several Rwandan graduates to the warm breeze that wafted over the sea of faculty and guests, Habumuremyi’s visit was a festive stop on an international campaign to strengthen ties between Rwanda and the U.S. Habumuremyi, who served as that African nation’s minister of education from May 2011 to October 2011, addressed the graduates of the private school in Riverside on Saturday. He said his presence there underscored the strong bond between his nation and the United States “and the leadership of this great university.”

In December 2011 the U.S. and Rwanda ratified the U.S.-Rwanda bilateral investment treaty (BIT) aimed at promoting open trade and investment.

The Rwandan official expressed pride in the first cohort of Rwandan students to receive their baccalaureate degrees under a presidential education agreement California Baptist University established with the East African nation in 2007.

“Rwanda’s sons and daughters, attending CBU under the Presidential Scholarship program have over the last four years carried out the unique responsibility of being Rwanda’s first ambassadors to CBU, and I am confident that they will go on to serve with distinction as CBU’s ambassadors to Rwanda when they return home,” Habumuremyi said.

Until 1994, educational opportunities for Rwandans were extremely limited. After the genocide, most primary schools and more than half of prewar secondary schools reopened, though no more than 5% of the adult population received secondary education through 1996. Although educational quality remains an issue, access to education expanded dramatically in recent years and the Government of Rwanda’s Nine-Year Basic Education policy, implemented in 2010, contributed to an increase of the primary school completion rate from 52.4% in 2008 to 79% in 2011. Free basic education was extended from 9 years to 12 years in 2012.

He congratulated all of the graduates on behalf of Rwanda’s president, His Excellency Paul Kagame, and the Rwandan people.

“As your friends and family, we share in your joy and are very proud of what you have accomplished in the course of your undergraduate education, both in and outside the classroom,” Habumuremyi said. “It is now incumbent upon you all to put to good use the knowledge and skills you have acquired from CBU and your passion to learn.” California Baptist University (CBU) graduated a record number of students during spring commencement ceremonies surpassing the 1,000-graduate mark for the fourth consecutive year. The Class of 2012 numbered 1,330 graduates, the largest in the 62-year history of CBU.

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU President, conferred degrees on a total of 281 graduate students and 786 undergraduates in separate ceremonies on Friday evening and Saturday morning. Another 263 students were eligible to graduate at the December 2011 commencement ceremony.

Dr. Richard L. “Rick” Miller, Superintendent of Riverside Unified School District spoke at graduate ceremonies held Friday evening. Miller told students receiving master’s degrees that they were “joining the top 10 percent nationally in educational attainment” and said that privilege comes with a responsibility. “As a member of the top 10 percent you will be responsible for leadership in our society,” Miller told the graduates. “You have been equipped by your professors and staff here at CBU, so there is little question that you know what to do. Now the question becomes, what will you do and will you make a difference?”

Walking While Black

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By Marian Wright Edelman

Every parent raising Black sons knows the dilemma: deciding how soon to have the talk. Choosing the words to explain to your beautiful child that there are some people who will never like or trust him just because of who he is—including some who should be there to protect him, but will instead have the power to hurt him. Training him how to walk, what to say, and how to act so he won’t seem like a threat. Teaching him that the burden of deflating stereotypes and reassuring other people’s ignorance will always fall on him, and while that isn’t fair, in some cases it may be the only way to keep him safe and alive.

But sometimes it isn’t enough. It wasn’t enough to protect Trayvon Martin. Seventeen-year-old Trayvon’s English teacher said he was “an A and B student who majored in cheerfulness.” Trayvon loved building models and taking things apart, his favorite subject was math, and he dreamed of becoming a pilot and an engineer. Instead, he was gunned down by a self-appointed neighborhood watch captain vigilante who profiled him, followed him, and shot him in the chest. His killer, George Zimmerman, saw the teenager on the street and called the police to report he looked “like he’s up to no good.” At the time Trayvon was walking home from the nearby 7-11 carrying a bottle of Arizona iced tea and a bag of Skittles for his younger stepbrother, leaving many people to guess that the main thing he was doing that made him look “no good” was wearing a hooded sweatshirt in the rain and walking while Black. George Zimmerman’s decisions made that suspicious enough to be a death sentence.

Now there is widespread outrage over the senseless killing of a young Black man who was doing nothing wrong and the fact that the man who killed him has not been arrested. People are trying to make sense of the series of gun laws that allowed George Zimmerman to act as he did—starting with the Florida laws that allowed someone like Zimmerman, who had previously been charged for resisting arrest with violence and battery on a police officer, to get a permit to carry a concealed weapon in the first place. Many more questions are being raised about Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” law, which also has been described as the “shoot first, ask questions later” law, and gives the benefit of the doubt to Zimmerman and others claiming “self-defense” by allowing people who say they are in imminent danger to defend themselves. Some states limit this defense to people’s own homes, but others, like Florida, allow it anywhere.

As Josh Horwitz, executive director of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, says, this law “has turned common law—and common sense—on its head by enabling vigilantes to provoke conflicts, resolve them with deadly force, and avoid ever having to set foot in a courtroom.” The fear in Trayvon’s death is that this is exactly what has happened so far: that the story told by witnesses, phone records, and Zimmerman’s violent past and earlier complaints during his neighborhood patrols shows an overzealous armed aggressor who followed Trayvon even after police told him to stop, chased Trayvon down when the frightened boy tried to walk away from the stranger following him, and then shot the unarmed, 100-pounds-lighter teenager while neighbors said they heard a child crying for help. The prospect now that Zimmerman might never set foot in a courtroom for the shooting has caused widespread frustration and fury.

Just as sadly, Trayvon’s death was not unique. In 2008 and 2009, 2,582 Black children and teens were killed by gunfire. Black children and teens were only 15 percent of the child population, but 45 percent of the 5,740 child and teen gun deaths in those two years. Black males 15 to 19 years-old were eight times as likely as White males to be gun homicide victims. The outcry over Trayvon’s death is absolutely right and just. We need the same sense of outrage over every one of these child deaths. Above all, we need a nation where these senseless deaths no longer happen. But we won’t get it until we have common-sense gun laws that protect children instead of guns and don’t allow people like George Zimmerman to take the law into their own hands. We won’t get it until we have a culture that sees every child as a child of God and sacred, instead of seeing some as expendable statistics, and others as threats and “no good” because of the color of their skin or because they chose to walk home wearing a hood in the rain. And we won’t get it until enough of us—parents and grandparents—stand up and tell our political leaders that the National Rifle Association should not be in charge of our neighborhoods, streets, gun laws, and values. In Trayvon’s case, his father Tracy speaks for what his family needs: “The family is calling for justice. We don’t want our son’s death to be in vain.” I hope that enough voices will ensure that it is not.

Marian Wright Edelman is President of the Children's Defense Fund whose Leave No Child Behind® mission is to ensure every child a Healthy Start, a Head Start, a Fair Start, a Safe Start and a Moral Start in life and successful passage to adulthood with the help of caring families and communities. For more information go to www.childrensdefense.org.

State Controller John Chiang To Speak At EITC Awareness Day

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California State Controller John Chiang will be the featured speaker at EITC Awareness Day sponsored by Community Action Partnership of Riverside County (CAP Riverside) on Friday, January 29 at 10:00 a.m. at California Baptist University. National EITC Awareness Day is organized by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and its stakeholders to educate the public about the Earned Income Tax Credit and requirements to claim the credit. The reception will take place in the Copenbarger Room at the Yeager Center, California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Avenue in Riverside. Controller John Chiang, Supervisor Marion Ashley, Mayor Ron Loveridge, representatives of the IRS, CBU and CAP Riverside will have remarks for the press and community.

At the conclusion of the remarks, the new CAP Mobile will be available for inspection. Volunteers will be preparing taxes on site in the mobile unit, which will be used to bring tax preparation services during special events throughout Riverside County.

Tax preparation will take place until 1:00 p.m. EITC is a refundable federal tax credit for working families who earn less than $50,000 a year. This credit helps reduce the tax burden on low and moderate-income families. Based on earnings and family situation, taxpayers can receive up to $5,657 in Earned Income Tax Credit refunds. Families may also qualify for other tax credits, including the Child Tax Credit, which can reduce a family’s tax liability by up to $1,000 per child. Also, refunds may be split and direct deposited into up to three different bank accounts.

Community Action Partnership of Riverside County is operating eight Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites throughout Riverside County, providing weekend and evening hours and bilingual volunteers to assist taxpayers.

Please contact Community Action Partnership of Riverside County at (951) 955-4900 or (800) 511-1110 or visit www.capriverside.org for addresses and times of operation.

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