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SCE Launches 2011 Solicitation for Renewable Power

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The nation’s leading utility for renewables is once again soliciting proposals to enhance its renewable energy portfolio. Southern California Edison (SCE) welcomes all eligible technologies, and is especially interested in generating facilities that can connect to existing or planned transmission lines.

This solicitation will be SCE’s ninth open, competitive call for additional renewable power contracts since 2002. Previous solicitations have secured more than 100 renewable energy contracts for billions of kilowatt-hours for SCE customers.

SCE has seen a steady increase in the number of power producers participating in the solicitations and anticipates a robust competitive process.

“Today, we see a vigorous market for renewable energy in California. This is a great benefit to our environment and our customers,” said Marc Ulrich, SCE vice president, Renewable and Alternative Power. “We look forward to working with established and emerging power producers to help move forward California’s clean and green energy future.”

Proposals are due on June 27, 2011, and SCE expects to submit completed contracts to the California Public Utilities Commission for approval by mid-2012. On May 26, SCE will host a Proposal Conference for interested parties.

For more on the Proposal Conference, and details about the request for proposals, please visit www.sce.com/renewrfp.

SCE’s longstanding commitment to renewable energy SCE has been procuring renewable energy for more than 20 years. In 2010, SCE delivered 14.5 billion kilowatt- hours of renewable energy to its customers – 19.4 percent of its total power deliveries under California’s Renewables Portfolio Standard guidelines. The portfolio of delivered renewable energy includes:

• 7.8 billion kilowatthours from geothermal sources.

• 4.2 billion kilowatthours from wind sources.

• 0.9 billion kilowatthours from biomass sources.

• 0.9 billion kilowatthours from solar sources.

• 0.7 billion kilowatthours from small hydro sources.

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