A+ R A-

Riverside Community Hospital appoints new Chief Financial Officer

E-mail Print PDF

RIVERSIDE - Riverside Community Hospital is pleased to announce the appointment of Russ Young as Chief Financial Officer, effective October 1, 2012. Mr. Young brings extensive health care finance and administration background to his new role at Riverside Community Hospital.

"We are delighted that Russ is joining Riverside Community Hospital as Chief Financial Officer and as a part of our executive team,” says President and CEO Patrick Brilliant. “With more than 15 years of finance experience and a broad and deep knowledge of hospital accounting and administration, I’m confident that Russ is a perfect candidate for the position. We look forward to welcoming him to our team.”

Since 2008, Russ has served as the CFO for HCA Central Florida Regional Hospital.  Russ has been a part of Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), Riverside Community Hospital’s parent company, since 1998, starting as an Accountant with HCA Ocala Regional Medical Center.  From there, he transitioned to the HCA Corporate office serving as an Internal Audit Manager, then moved on to Controller for HCA Mountain Division, then CFO for HCA South Bay Hospital in the West Florida Division.

Russ played a significant role in the success of HCA Central Florida Regional Hospital. During his time there, he was instrumental in developing and implementing growth strategies that contributed in making Central Florida Regional an excellent performing hospital. “I am extremely excited to join the Riverside Community Hospital family!  My wife, Pam, and our children look forward to relocating to the Riverside area in October and engraining ourselves in this wonderful community. I know that RCH is an organization that really does care for the community and I am looking forward to being a part of the team.  Personally, I am eager to begin building friendships both inside and outside the walls of our Hospital.”

Russ received his Masters of Business Administration at Mercer University, Macon, Georgia.  Russ is married to his wife, Pamela, and they have three children:  Kelsey (12), Hailey (10), and Caleb (7).

Torlakson Appoints Inglewood High Alumnus as State Administrator for Inglewood Unified School District

E-mail Print PDF

INGLEWOOD—State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson today appointed Kent Taylor—himself a graduate of Inglewood High School—as State Administrator over the financially troubled Inglewood Unified School District.           “My top priority is to keep Inglewood’s schools open and serving its students, while returning the district to fiscal solvency, and ultimately, local control,” Torlakson said. “Kent Taylor is the right choice for this tough, but critically important, job. He has deep roots in the Inglewood community, and a proven track record as a leader and sound fiscal manager.”           Taylor, who currently serves as Superintendent of the Southern Kern Unified School District, brings two decades of experience working in California’s public schools to his new assignment. He has worked as a teacher, assistant principal, principal, and other administrative assignments in San Bernardino, Yucaipa, San Jacinto, and Rialto before being named superintendent in 2011.

“It’s an honor to come home to Inglewood and serve a community and a school system that have meant so much to me,” Taylor said. “I look forward to the opportunity to address the many challenges we face and working to give every Inglewood student the same opportunity to succeed that I enjoyed.”

Taylor earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of California, Riverside; his teaching credential at the University of La Verne; and Masters of Education degree at California State University, San Bernardino. He served 12 years as a school board member at Colton Unified School District. Taylor has also been awarded for exemplary service as an educator and is a member of several professional education associations, including the California Association of Latino Superintendents and Administrators, and the Association of California School Administrators.

The state took over the district last month, when, at the district’s request, Governor Brown approved legislation that would provide up to $55 million in emergency loans to help the district meet its financial obligations. The loan must be repaid within 20 years.

The legislation required the State Superintendent of Public Instruction to assume all the legal rights, duties, and powers of the governing board of the district and appoint a state administrator. By law, the school district's elected governing board serves only in an advisory capacity until a number of conditions are met.

The Superintendent’s authority continues until the district has adequate fiscal systems and controls in place, and the Superintendent has determined that the district's future compliance with the fiscal plan approved for the district is probable. The recovery plan also includes steps to improve the district's community relations and governance, pupil achievement, financial management, personnel management, and facilities management.

Inglewood Unified School District is the ninth school district in California to request an emergency loan, thus triggering the state takeover, since 1990. Since then, local governance has been returned to five districts. For more information, please visit the California Department of Education's HYPERLINK "http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fi/ir/stateemergloans.asp" \t "_blank" State Emergency Loans Web page.

Riverside City College Announces 2012 Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees

E-mail Print PDF

Riverside City College recently announced its 2012 Athletic Hall of Fame inductees and award recipients. Among the honorees is former Major League Baseball player Bobby Kielty and state championship women’s basketball coach Michael Barnes.

The 2012 awards continue a rich sports tradition that includes former inductees Jerry Tarkanian, Frank Corral, Ben Blomdahl, and Terica Ned-Pelt. Joining this elite group this year along with Kielty and Barnes are RCC softball player and record-holder Rachael Bermudez, 1980-90’s era public announcer Richard Hubbard, RCC Marching Tigers’ longtime supporter and top booster William Locke, and business contributor Scott Hooks.

“This year’s inductees and award winners exemplify the outstanding athletic heritage enjoyed by Riverside City College,” said RCC President Cynthia Azari. “Athletics truly brings the College and community together as we cheer the RCC teams and celebrate the accomplishments of our outstanding student athletes.”

RCC’s new Athletic Director Derrick Johnson will serve as master of ceremony for the event, which takes place on November 1 at 5:30 p.m. “This is going to be a special year,” Johnson said. “We are very excited to be holding the event in the newly renovated Wheelock Gym. It will be the first night we publicly celebrate the opening, and I can’t wait to welcome the awardees and many friends and supporters to our ‘new house.’”

2012 Inductees and Award Recipients

Female Athlete – Rachael Bermudez played softball at RCC for the 2000 and 2001 seasons, achieving a record 322 strikeouts in her sophomore year. She was recognized as MVP of the Orange Empire Conference and named to the All State Team. She holds the RCC record for pitching complete games, as well as five other career pitching categories.

Male Athlete – Bobby Kielty played for the Tigers from 1996 through 1997 before heading to the University of Mississippi. He was named MVP of the Cape Cod League after leading the league in batting average and RBIs. In 1998, he was named Summer Player of the Year by Baseball America and signed with the Minnesota Twins in 1999. Kielty’s professional career lasted 13 years, the last 10 in the big leagues playing for the Twins, Oakland A’s, Redsox, and Indians. In his only at bat in the World Series, he hit a home run, the gaming winning RBI.

Coach – Michael Barnes served as Head Women’s Basketball Coach at RCC for nearly 20 years, building a 328-230 record en route to becoming the winningest coach in Tigers’ history. His record in conference play was 150-92 and 14 of his 20 teams went to the playoffs. Barnes-coached teams won three conference titles and one state championship. As an RCC basketball player in the 1960s, Barnes was named All Conference, All Tournament, and Most Valuable Player. His career assist record remains second on the list in RCC history.

Contributor – William Locke has been one of the Marching Tigers Band’s main boosters and volunteers since 1984 when his son, Gary Locke, started the college band. Through the years he has done everything—from helping his wife and sister sew uniforms and flags, bake, and run fundraisers to fixing instrument cases, building props, and supervising the loading and unloading of the equipment truck. His family and generations of Marching Tigers know him as “Grandpa” and consider him the chief honorary Marching Tiger.

Business Contributor – Scott Hooks, Westcoe Realty, Inc., has worked and lived in the community for decades. An RCC alumnus, he was one of the founding members of the RCC Tigerbackers, a major support organization for RCC Athletics and continues to be a strong advocate and fan of RCC athletics.

Event sponsors include Tilden-Coil Constructors, Inc.; Riverside Public Utilities; Gresham Savage; Riverside Medical Clinic; and Riverside County Supervisors Bob Buster - 1st District, John Tavaglione - 2nd District, and Marion Ashley - 5th District.

For event information and ticket availability, call 951-222-8958.

CSUSB Institute To Donate School Supplies To Fill 144 Backpacks At Local School

E-mail Print PDF

SAN BERNARDINO – The Institute of Applied Research and Policy Analysis at Cal State San Bernardino will donate school supplies to fill 144 backpacks at Emmerton Elementary School in San Bernardino on Friday, Sept. 21, at 9:30 a.m.
The institute has joined the effort with the Arrowhead United Way, which will help distribute the backpacks, and is working with Emmerton Elementary School Principal Tasha Lindsey-Doizan. Emmerton Elementary School is located at 1888 Arden Ave., in San Bernardino.

The gift by the institute, which publishes the monthly Purchasing Managers’ Index for the Inland Empire, is making the donations on behalf of the local Inland Empire manufacturing companies who support and participate in the monthly survey.
“It’s our way of saying thank you to those local manufacturers,” said institute co-director Barbara Sirotnik. “We know that time is a valuable commodity, so asking a manufacturing team to take a few minutes to fill out an online survey on top of their regular duties is very much appreciated.” The Purchasing Managers’ Index serves as an indicator of the manufacturing industries’ trends and sentiment. In addition to providing data on actual production, new orders, price pressures, and inventories, the PMI is also a confidence indicator said institute co-director Shel Bockman.

“Since the answers given by managers reflect perceptions as much as they reflect reality, traders can use the PMI number as a sentiment indicator,” Bockman said. 
The Institute of Applied Research and Policy Analysis has been producing the Inland Empire Purchasing Managers’ Index since 1993. The survey is sent to more than 100 manufacturers in the Inland Empire on a monthly basis.

For more information on the school supply donation and the institute, contact Lori Aldana, project coordinator at the CSUSB Institute of Applied Research and Policy Analysis, at (909) 537-5925 or e-mail laldana@csusb.edu and visit the institute website at HYPERLINK "http://iar.csusb.edu/" \t "_blank" http://iar.csusb.edu/.

Poor Parents' Education Is Key In Their Children's Escape From Poverty

E-mail Print PDF

Washington, D.C. — Earning a high school diploma today can help break the cycle of poverty tomorrow, according to an Urban Institute HYPERLINK "http://www.urban.org/publications/412659.html" \t "_blank" study. White children born to poor high school dropouts are 12 percentage points more likely to be persistently poor (that is, poor for at least half their lives from birth through age 17) than white children whose poor parents earned a diploma. The comparable number for black children is 21 percentage points. The difference between white children whose parents did not finish 12th grade and whose parents have education beyond high school is 30 percentage points. For black children, the figure is 45 percentage points. "Children, and in particular minority children, born to poor undereducated parents face a challenging beginning and are substantially more likely to spend most of their formative years in poverty," say researchers Caroline Ratcliffe and Signe-Mary McKernan. "Connecting at-risk children to appropriate services at birth is vital, as a child's early environment can affect brain development." Using data from the University of Michigan's Panel Study of Income Dynamics, Ratcliffe and McKernan tracked, through 2008, the life trajectory of children born between 1967 and 1989.

Children born between 1967 and 1974 had lower poverty rates (13 percent) than newborns in the 1980s and 1990s (18–19 percent). The poverty rate dipped to 15 percent for infants born between 2000 and 2008, but this downward trend stalled with the Great Recession. Child poverty rates hit a nearly 20-year high in 2010 (22 percent) and remained there in 2011.

The fallout from a parent's low educational attainment hits beyond childhood experiences and into adolescent outcomes. Children whose parents did not complete high school are 18 percentage points more likely to enter their 20s without completing high school than children whose parents have some education beyond high school (even after controlling for childhood poverty and other factors). These children are also 10 percentage points more likely to drop out of high school than children whose parents earn a high school degree (but did not have additional education). " HYPERLINK "http://www.urban.org/publications/412659.html" \t "_blank" Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence" also finds that children poor early in life (age 0-2), for longer periods, and in a family where adults do not work are less likely to complete high school.

Among other findings Between 1967 and 2008, one of every 10 white newborns was poor, compared with four of 10 black newborns. Of those poor at birth, 30 percent of the white children and 46 percent of the black children live in deep poverty (family income below 50 percent of the federal poverty level). Children poor for half their childhoods are nearly 90 percent more likely than never-poor children to enter their 20s without completing high school (controlling for other factors). Persistently poor girls are also four times more likely to give birth outside of marriage during their teenage years. Dropping out of high school and teen childbearing, in turn, perpetuate the cycle of poverty because they are obstacles to economic success.

Children who move because of an eviction, foreclosure, or divorce are less likely to complete high school by age 20 than children who do not move or move for neutral or positive reasons. In some cases, children are forced to change schools, which introduces further instability into their lives, especially if the move occurs during the school year or does not coincide with a natural school transition (such as the switch from middle school to high school).

Because the foreclosure crisis has displaced many school-age children, Ratcliffe and McKernan point out that flexible policies to allow students to remain in their original schools could give them some stability during a difficult period and lead to higher educational attainment.

 HYPERLINK "http://www.urban.org/publications/412126.html" \t "_blank" Previous research by Ratcliffe and McKernan looked at the poverty environment for children born in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The new study considers all children born between 1967 and 2008.

"Child Poverty and Its Lasting Consequence" was supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation through the Urban Institute's HYPERLINK "http://www.urban.org/center/lwf/index.cfm" \t "_blank" Low-Income Working Families project.

Page 15 of 91

BVN National News Wire