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Self-Defeating Patterned Thinking

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The most significant aspects of the "Stereotyping" characterizing Patterned Thinkers (PT) are: being off the "Truth-Track"; not knowing the Truth to get back on track; and going farther and farther away from Reality. The result of ones beliefs not accurately reflecting Truth and Reality is a Vicious Cycle lifestyle. Whatever comes out of those beliefs is outside the realm of common sense and thereby causes one to engage in vicious decisions and vicious solutions--i.e. applying what has already proven not to work or has no chance of working because the proposed solution is not a match with what is likely to give the best results. Acting like a bowling ball striking bowling pins, a vicious decision/solution makes matters worse and worse by creating a cycle of more and more problems.

Furthermore, the beneficial lessons to be found in their own flawed experiences never teach "Creatures of Habit" anything. Instead, they stay with "Self-Defeating Courage," meaning it is without calculated judgment. With respect to ones Public Self, when one thinks in patterns one does not properly assess what comes in from the outside world. Instead of seeing that information (including questions) with eye glasses having a clear lens, one has "shades" on which causes one to "see" that information inside certain channels. One channel is "this is not for me"; a second channel is "this is the way I want it to be"; a third, "I don't like you and therefore I am not going to listen to anything you say"; a fourth, "I like you and will therefore believe everything you say"; and a fifth, "I am too busy and thus whatever you say will not make any difference"; "my way is the only way". Part of this process translates someone's "maybe" into a "yes" answer for this indicates what one wants to hear or what one expects to hear as a justification for not doing something.

Private Self "Shades" direct one to take on an accustomed PT role: (1) not bothering to know what is the real situation; (2) not hearing what has been said; (3) not being curious enough to try to discover the meaning of what is going on; (4) being satisfied with dumb answers; and (5) fitting another's question, answer, or information into an accustomed patterned response. By serving to self-protect from being "nakedly" exposed is an extremely common defense mechanism for those lacking in the "5Ss." One reason is the bad ways they think of themselves. Another is realizing what they say and do is only a facade which is either full of flaws and/or has no substance or depth behind their "false-front" appearance. This is why stepping outside reality enables them to draw on a predetermined patterned response to convey only what they want questioners to know. They "play their hand close to the vest" to keep the questioner from knowing any personal "immaturity secrets". Hence, Weak People, when asked, "did you make that mistake?" answer by blurting out an automatic "No!" without ever trying to discover the nature of the mistake. Similarly, dishonorable people give some "off-the-track" answer so as to divert what the questioners want to know. Likewise, Europeans have the need to speak of themselves as "superior" because they feel the opposite and do not want to be exposed.

"Speaking out of ones shades" is done to not only keep one from looking bad but also to make one look good or at least seem as if one is in charge and everything is under control. To carry off these unrealistic objectives causes PT to make promises they know they will not keep (e.g. Yeah, I'll do that right away). By lacking integrity in keeping their word, they do not trust themselves. The intent is for their defense mechanisms (e.g. displaying ill-advised "know-it-all" power) to keep others from seeing how weak they are. By failing to realize their limitations from doing non-thought-out things, they are models for the expression: "Seldom right but never in doubt." Being wrong at least 35% of the time does not bother them. So, they do not assess their mistakes or learn the lessons it takes to strive for perfection, as do Critical Thinkers.

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