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Self-Absorbed

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Pre-colonial Africans were inwardly free to head toward the "Heaven-Afterlife" and outwardly free to cultivate good relationships with and good behaviors toward each other. By contrast, the impact of African American slavery--causing a "Fight," "Flight," or "Fright" mindset--forced the Enslaved to stay ever alert to outer world threats, disturbances, and dangers. However, those who accommodated their lives to plantation horrors and chose not to "fight or flee" were in a chronic reaction of "Fright"--a depressed ('pushed down') mind which "does nothing” from not knowing what to do except focus only on surviving and enduring. Being afraid (“Fright”) is the result of a collection of many kinds of negative emotional upsets occurring at the same time--upsets powered by rage and fear as reactions to their daily extreme intimidation ("to make timid" by word or by gesture) from whippings or loss of life or limb. Fright is essentially "frozen" negative emotions producing Selfhood "numbness"--similar to when an "anesthetic" takes away sensations from a part of ones body. In emergencies this can be lifesaving, as in withdrawing from view of the enemy by lying down and hiding. But "Chronic Fright" converts from the Instinct Emergency Brain reactions into operating out of what I call an Omnibus Brain state. This state's over-all effect is that of a mental "Funk" (an early Black American term for a style of the "Blues" but used in World War I for a dug-out) whereby one has permanently withdrawn into ones inner world, (like a turtle into a shell from being under constant attacks). Self-absorbed is an illusion (a false front hiding what is really there) of being in a safe place, as when little children put their hands over their eyes and believe the outsider standing next to them has gone away. Though neither "accommodative safety" illusion is sufficiently strong to prevent anxiety and worry, still one builds a lifestyle around ones self-absorption features--a lifestyle capable of being culturally transmitted.

Nevertheless, to be self-absorbed is to automatically place oneself at the center of the universe while living inside a hostile world. What one is looking for is the "5Ss"--Safety (danger-free in a strongbox), Security (having what is needed), Sureness (Confidence), Stability (not easily toppled), and Strength (power). There can be no "5Ss" when one is self-absorbed because one has the sense of "teetering on the edge" of disaster while surrounded by a disturbing inner/outer world of unknown or glob causes." This inner world consists of Spiritual Pain (from being disconnected from the Love Platter); self-consciousness; bashfulness and feelings of aloneness; sadness and emotional pain; being apart from everything, everybody, and the universe; and a sense of powerlessness. The mindset habit of powerlessness causes it to be present even when there is no cause for being frightened. The resultant loss of personal strength fashions inadequacies in directing the events occurring around him/her and that lays bear ones feelings to be easily, frequently, and deeply hurt. This means the self-absorbed mind is about living daily in the "here and now" where ones orientation is totally devoted to Omnibus Brain type survival, self-preservation, and self-protection.

Such a mindset causes one to obsessively and compulsively act and react out of a fear response by excessive personal over-protectiveness. By not being open to new information and new experiences, one acquires malignant thoughts of personal failure in various aspects of ones life. There is an ongoing lack of interest in things which ordinarily should be of interest; a greatly compromised ability to concentrate and focus; and an outlook on life as if one is looking through gray colored lens. This leads one to stay on a treadmill of constant mental activity without progress headed toward being "a happy Somebody." All of these factors serve as barriers to prevent the attainment of success and, instead keep one in a chronic juggling lifestyle. Correction occurs by means of a "Brain Switch" return to wholistic thinking.

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