A+ R A-

Classification of Jugglers

E-mail Print PDF

Share this article with a friend

A distinction been made between Balancers (the mentally strong who make progress) and Jugglers (those who only talk about making progress). The Thinker's Scale (a positive and a negative ruler separated by zero) is a useful tool for forming rough ideas about Jugglers, regardless of their position on the Black American social ladder. The labels for the four subdivisions of each ruler are: Mild (1to 24); Slight (25-49); Moderate (50­74); and Extreme or Severe (75-99). It is the Juggler's philosophy of life; degree of organized or disorganized mindset and practices; presence or absence of self-defeating habits; and degree of reacting to the bad that ultimately determine which category is applicable and on which scale. Each category has its structural base, foundation, and above ground competency--and their props. The juggling portions of an individual's life may be occasional/ repeated/continuous; temporary/chronic; or be a portion of ones life or represent a way of life. The mentally strong (usually Doers) do good juggling and achieve goals. Observing how people cook often gives a hint as to who are or who are likely to be Jugglers.

Mild Jugglers take a long time to cook a simple meal. Slight Jugglers heat up and place on the table a salmon patty (out of a package) and corn and beans (out of separate cans). However, on the kitchen counter they use 10 pots and pans, 8 plates and saucers, 12 pieces of silverware, etc.--thereby creating as much work to do in getting things back in order as it took to cook the meal. ModerateChronic Jugglers fail to put these things back on the shelves. Extreme Chronic Jugglers allow the food on each of these to dry which, of course, requires more time, energy, and effort to get rid of that dried food. All of these Jugglers have out of control organizational skills; waste time in all they do; allow needless problems to happen, and then get bigger before taking action, if at all. When there is no attempt tohandle each problem as it arises (e.g. like washing each plate as it is used and putting it back on the shelf), then they quickly get overwhelmed with problems--and those problems create more problems. Every problem is like removing a Prop off of an organizational structure and the more props removed, the greater the magnitude of what needs to be juggled. If this pattern is present outside the kitchen and in other areas of ones life, the accumulated problems generate ripples of disorganizing mental processes and, as a result, there are fashioned various types of self-defeating patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving present in all activities of daily living. The mental structure of Extreme Jugglers lack props; much soundness in mental structure; and a clear foundational base of Love.

By contrast, successful "Doers" have a well- structured mindset situated on a foundational Love base, an organized mind, and efficient and effective habits. Together these make for successful "Balancing." Usually Do-ers problems are caused by Be-ers. Example: A Doer (who makes well- thought out decisions and sticks with them) says to a Be-er (whose decisions change on a whim): "when you come over bring food to cook while we are waiting for the repairman" and to the Doer this is final. But the morning the repairman is to arrive, the Be-er decides on going out to eat after the repairman comes and therefore does not bring food. Now, because repairmen do not keep their word, the Doer cannot go out early to get food because the repairman might come early. Either the repairman does not show up at all or may do so hours later than he said. Meanwhile, there is no food in the house and, while waiting, both the Doer and Be-er have to juggle things in order to eat. The point is that not paying attention to detail; not handling little things; not taking care of problems when they arise; not cleaning up; not putting things back where they belong after completing a job; leaving a job for others to do; and not sticking with a decision are each bad habits that generate vicious cycles of juggling and failures.

www.jablifeskills.com

Quantcast