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JAB's African Holocaust Talk (1/4)

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At the 19th Annual African Holocaust Commemoration at the KRST Unity Centre of Afrikan Spiritual Science on 10/9/10 in Los Angeles (7825 S. Western Ave.; 323-759-7567) I was asked by Bro. Anra to address: "Why are struggling Black Americans disconnected from African Tradition?"; "What have we lost from this disconnection?"

I expressed my appreciation for having been invited again to share ideas on my work with struggling Black boys. Then I proceeded with saying I am an orthopaedic surgeon which, in essence, means diagnosing and treating or managing patients. These two questions are in the realm of diagnosis but it naturally follows that once the problem is understood the next essential step is to take action to do something about curing the problem. But to put my answer to these two questions in perspective, upon entering the specialty of Orthopaedic Surgery in 1964 I was the tenth Black American to do so. Up to that point, the field of orthpaedics was dominated by White Southerners and the subject was taught by an established orthopaedic surgeon taking the resident under his wing, similar to a master/apprentice relationship.

Eventually, I was the second one to pass the board examinations and the first to write a medical text on orthopaedic surgery. These three aspects were a call to action for racists orthopaedic surgeons to do everything they could to prevent each from happening. And they were clever, vicious, and together in their efforts to see to it that I failed.

By being Isolated (no one to turn to for any kind of help) and by being machine-gunned with problems generated by these racists and by having to handle the new and difficult education and training aspects of orthopaedic surgery and by dealing with daily living problems -- all made me an Individualist. Thus, I had to figure out how to conquer "BIG" problems never seen nor heard of before--and immediately-- and perfectly (not simply good). This even applied to "womb" problems yet to be born. As a result of successfully figuring out Rational Thinking processes to survive, it was my belief that this process would be transferrable to struggling Black youth whose problems were equally as great, though on a different level and of a different type (still within the same racism ballpark).

Under the belief that if these youth knew how to think in rational and critical ways they could figure out how to handle their own problems. So, in the mid 1970s I started gathering Black youth one-on-one and in groups and proceeded to teach them Rational Thinking.

But the results were less than ideal and, no doubt, from something I was lacking in teaching skills. One of those things was in having only a "snapshot" of who these boys really were and what they were about. Instead, what I needed was a "movie" of them that started in Very Ancient Africa and went through details of slavery and on into today's inner cities or wherever struggling Black youth reside. My focus was on understanding Black Minds at their best and at their worse throughout history. However, this undertaking was simply overwhelming--in the proportion of an ant trying to eat an elephant. And how do you eat an elephant? Answer: One bite at a time. This meant that the best way for me to maintain some degree of order was to write in books, complete with an index, what I was learning. Jab's African Holocaust Talk (1/4)And that practice began with the first of 26 books on Black history in 2005--each book representing "one bite" of understanding the problems of struggling Black boys.

The best way for me to maintain some degree of order was to write in books, complete with an index, what I was learning. And that practice began with the first of 26 books on Black history in 2005. The information to follow is elaborated upon in my book: Bailey, Unlocking Minds of Black Boys.

website: www.jablifeskills.com

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