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Tasks

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Destruction done to African Minds when brought to the Americas as Slaves constituted a Maafa (“immeasurable catastrophe”)-- and it continues. For example, the Slaves disconnected their life's and daily tasks from their African Tradition Spiritual Energy and replaced it with Negative Emotional Energy. To put this in perspective let us look briefly at the word "Task."

In African Tradition the ideas contained in "Task" were welcomed practices required to get to the Heaven Afterlife and African people's lives were built around this goal. In other words, Humans' work was viewed as an intensification of the work the God Spirit does in nature, but on a tiny scale. This concept came out of Ancient African Spiritual Literature related to Ra-Atum (known as God) giving birth to the Neteru (i.e. the gods and goddesses)-- i.e. to Shu, Tefnut, Geb, Nut, Asar, Aset, Set, Nebethet, and Heru Ur. If we could think of these ten as forming an octopus with nine tentacles (instead of the normal eight), God would be represented by the head and the tentacles by the other nine offspring Deities serving as aspects of God in the form of Helping Hands. In turn, the deceased Ancestors became Helping Hands to these same traditional pantheon of lesser gods while the people became Helping Hands not only to each other but to the deceased Ancestors, to the gods and goddesses, and to God. By this process every being continually helped every other being.

This is a foundational concept related to ones Mission in life. To rightly live within this image of being Helping Hands on earth in doing God’s work required that each African realize his/her individualized and unique Purpose or Mission in life. The first job was for each individual to discover and develop his/her own talent. Next was to find the proper niche whereby ones gifts would do the most good, for the most people, and over the longest period of time--and thereby contribute to the healing of and the pleasure added to this world. Another way Ancient African people served as God's helpers was in having good relationships with and good behaviors towards all of God's creatures and creations--whether by working together in the fields, working on things, engaging in reflective thinking, or creating or inventing something. For example, when women gathered to make pottery, they acknowledged this ability to create as part of Nature’s design as well as part of their Purpose (Somé African Healing p 66). Hence, selfless service, community, and dedication to individual lofty visions were emphasized. By so doing made it easier for God's nine spiritual helpers to best guide the people toward reaching the heaven Afterlife. Is there any cultural thing more beautifully arranged than this?

For Europeans, the 14th century English word "Task" meant a piece of work imposed as a duty. The meaning of "to assign a task" to a person is first recorded in 1530 in the sense of piece work, usually in small amounts and at intermittent periods. Then it came to apply to any unit of work or pursuit, as when speaking of ones daily tasks--which of course includes activities of daily living as well as the pursuit of ones goals (e.g. career, legacy).

Notice the typical differences in the context and meaning inside the "task" of African Tradition and those of Europe Tradition. Whereas African meanings start from what is God-made and expand from a place of spirituality into the material world, European ideas for words start from a man-made place and deal with the material world--while ignoring the spiritual. However, the point is that to switch from an African concept of task to that of European makes for a world of difference.

website: www.jablifeskills.com

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